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Getting Started

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ESOL | Speaking About Art

Getting Started

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ESOL | Speaking About Art

Getting Started
Images of previous Speaking About Art projects. Courtesy of The Courtauld and New City College
Images of previous Speaking About Art projects. Courtesy of The Courtauld and New City College
Images of previous Speaking About Art projects. Courtesy of The Courtauld and New City College
Images of previous Speaking About Art projects. Courtesy of The Courtauld and New City College
Images of previous Speaking About Art projects. Courtesy of The Courtauld and New City College
Images of previous Speaking About Art projects. Courtesy of The Courtauld and New City College
Images of previous Speaking About Art projects. Courtesy of The Courtauld and New City College

Getting Started: 

Exploring Art history with students can be a fun and rewarding way of enhancing language skills, which can easily be incorporated into your curriculum using the activities found within this resource hub.  

In this section you will find some simple activities to get students looking at and talking about art, without even realising. 

In this section you will find: 

Visual Glossary: 

The downloadable visual glossary can be used in a number of ways: 

  • As a starting activity to introduce art terms used throughout the resources 
  • As a reference alongside the activity sheets, using the vocabulary word bank (on page 2 of the visual glossary) 

Mix and Match Icebreakers: 

  • Discuss each term in the visual glossary with learners, until they are familiar with them.  
  • Cut up the glossary and mix them up.  
  • Ask learners to match the art terms to their corresponding images.

Extension Activity, which encourages learners to work in pairs with peers who they may not normally mix with: 

  • Cut up the visual glossary and hand out a single image or definition to each learner.  
  • Learners must find the person with the matching definition for their image and vice versa.  
  • You can also chop words in half from the word bank and ask learners to find the person with the other half of their word.  
  • Ask learners to describe or draw a definition of the word once they have matched them.

 

Useful Links: 

The Courtauld

The Courtauld Virtual Gallery Tour 

The Courtauld Collection Archive

Top tips for searching the archive: 

  • Search for keywords in the quicksearch (entering a single word yields better results) 
  • Use the Advanced search and select a category under object type to narrow the results 

 


Artwork credits for Visual Glossary (All images The Courtauld Gallery, London (Samuel Courtauld Trust) © The Courtauld):

Pieter Bruegel the Elder (c. 1525-1569), Landscape with the Flight into Egypt, 1563,Oil on panel, 37.1 x 55.6 cm
Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640), Family of Jan Brueghel the Elder, 1613–15, Oil on panel, 125.1 x 95.2 cm
Paul Cézanne (1839-1906), Pot of Primroses and Fruit, 1888-90, Oil on canvas, 46 x 56.25 cm
Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890), Self-Portrait with Bandaged Ear, 1889, Oil on canvas, 60.5 x 50 cm
Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), Studies for Saint Mary Magdalene, around 1480-82, Pen and brown ink, on laid paper; later framing line in graphite, partially trimmed, 13.8 x 8 cm,
Richard Long (b.1945), A Line Made By Walking, 1967, Black and white photograph (silver gelatin print) mounted on board and titled in red crayon and graphite, 37.5 x 32 cm (photograph), courtesy of the artist
Winifred Gill (1891-1981), Marigolds, 1920s, Lino cut, 8.8 x 13.7 cm (image size)
Edgar Degas (1834-1917), Dancer ready to dance, right foot forward, around 1885-1890, Bronze casting, A A Hébrard Foundry, Paris, 56.3h x 32.6w x 22d cm
Drug jar or albarello decorated with a spotted cat, Circa 1550, Italy (Castelli), Tin-glazed earthenware, 16.8 cm (unchecked);
Attributed to Roger Eliot Fry (1866-1934), Chair with embroidered seat back, 1913, Embroidery attributed to Vanessa Bell (1879-1961) or Winifred Gill (1891-1981), Painted wood, leather; chairback worked in cross-stitch with coloured wools, 54.2 x 37.5 cm (seat back); 105.3 x 59.8 cm (chair)
Metalwork bag, early 1300s, made in Mosul, Northern Iraq, Silver inlay, 15.2h x 22w x 13.5d cm
Paul Cézanne (1839-1906), Montagne Sainte-Victoire with Large Pine, 1887, Oil on canvas, 66.8 x 92.3 cm

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