Object Lessons: Art at the Courts of France and Burgundy in the 14th and 15th centuries - The Courtauld Institute of Art

Object Lessons: Art at the Courts of France and Burgundy in the 14th and 15th centuries

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MA History of Art Special Option

Object Lessons: Art at the Courts of France and Burgundy in the 14th and 15th centuries

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Prof Susie Nash

This course will investigate objects made at the courts of France and Burgundy in the 14th and 15th century, a period when these centres led Europe in the production of luxury goods. By looking across media from metalwork to manuscripts, panel painting to sculpture, it will consider questions of scale as well as material and technique, how these complex works were crafted, what they cost, how they were used. At the heart of this is close looking, a consideration of their physical evidence as well as their often eventful trajectories through time. The aim is to teach an art history that puts the object at the centre, and builds questions in widening circles from them, using a body of rich documentary sources in tandem with technical and physical analysis.

 

 

Courtauld Course Lecturer

About the lecturer

Susie Nash came to The Courtauld in 1993 and has taught here on the art of northern Europe in the late medieval and renaissance period ever since. Susie has worked and published on illuminated manuscripts, sculpture, textiles, metalwork and panel painting from across northern Europe, including Spain. She is interested in how art was made, used and viewed, in the value and meaning of materials and their colour, combining evidence from primary archival and theological sources, with the physical and technical examination of the work itself. Current research projects include the production, purpose and status of inventories at the french courts c. 1360-1500; sculptural processes and practices, especially polychromy, and photography of sculpture; art produced for the courts of France c. 1400 especially for the Duke of Burgundy in Dijon at the Chartreuse de Champmol; Claus Sluter, Jean Malouel and the Early Netherlandish painter the Master of Flémalle.

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