Medieval Pictorial Typology: The Contribution of England - The Courtauld Institute of Art

Medieval Pictorial Typology: The Contribution of England

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Medieval Work in Progress Seminar

Medieval Pictorial Typology: The Contribution of England

The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London

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Typological Window, Canterbury Cathedral

  • Thursday 7 December 2017
    PLEASE NOTE: This Date Has Passed
    4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

    Research Forum Seminar Room, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London, WC2R 0RN

Speaker

  • Lucy Freeman Sandler - New York University

Organised by

  • Dr Alixe Bovey - Courtauld Institute of Art

After an introductory survey of the rise of pictorial typology, this illustrated lecture will focus on the important role played by England in its development to maturity.  Four examples will be discussed: the late twelfth century typological windows of Canterbury cathedral; the guide to pictorial typology known as Pictor in Carmine of ca. 1200; the early thirteenth century typological choir-stall paintings of Peterborough Abbey; and the series of typological miniatures of the early fourteenth century Peterborough Psalter in Brussels. The lecture will end with observations on the rise of pictorial cycles of detailed historical narrative as alternatives to those based on typology.

Lucy Freeman Sandler is Helen Gould Sheppard Professor of Art History, emerita, at New York University, the institution from which she received her Ph.D.  Among her publications are: Gothic Manuscripts, 1285-1385, A Survey of Manuscripts Illuminated in the British Isles, Vol. 5, edited by J. J. G. Alexander, 2 vols. (London and New York, 1986);  Studies in Manuscript Illumination, 1200-1400 (London, 2008); and Illuminators and Patrons in Fourteenth-Century England: The Psalter and Hours of Humphrey de Bohun and the Manuscripts of the Bohun Family (London, 2014); she is the author of seven additional monographs and numerous articles on fourteenth century English manuscripts. Recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities (1967, 1977), the Simon Guggenheim Foundation (1988), and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation (2010), she is a Fellow of the Medieval Academy of America and the Society of Antiquaries of London.

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