The making of the sixteenth-century interior in England - The Courtauld Institute of Art

The making of the sixteenth-century interior in England

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Early Modern, Research Seminars
Early Modern seminar series

The making of the sixteenth-century interior in England

The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London

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Queen Elizabeth Receives the Dutch Ambassadors (Neue Galerie, Kassel © Museumslandschaft Hessen Kassel)

  • Monday 13 February 2017
    PLEASE NOTE: This Date Has Passed
    5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

    Research Forum seminar room, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London, WC2R 0RN

Speaker

  • Prof. Maurice Howard - University of Sussex

Organised by

  • Prof. Christine Stevenson - The Courtauld Institute of Art

The physical interiors of early modern England exist now only in fragments or later re-modellings, but piecing together this evidence shows how care for materials, improvisation and a willingness to use painted illusion gave internal spaces a degree of visual cohesion. Three other kinds of evidence offer more to the historian: the documentary sources of commissions and inventories, the small but significant number of representations in paint and print, the descriptions of contemporaries, all of which sometimes complement each other but often tell us more about their various and highly individual modes and conventions of recording than give us a composite understanding.

Maurice Howard is Professor Emeritus of Art History at the University of Sussex. His books include The Early Tudor Country House 1490-1550 (1987), The Tudor Image (1995), and The Building of Elizabethan and Jacobean England (2007). He co-authored The Vyne: A Tudor House Revealed (2003), and co-edited Painting in Britain 1500-1630 (2015). He was Senior Subject Specialist for the Tudor and Stuart sections of the British Galleries at the V&A, and is a former President of the Society of Antiquaries of London and the current President of the Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain.

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