Student Frequently Asked Questions - The Courtauld Institute of Art

Student Frequently Asked Questions

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Student Frequently Asked Questions

1) Introduction to SAS
2) Contact information
3) Official documentation
4) Qualifications
5) Assignments
6) Concerns and complaints
7) Systems
8) Examinations
9) Library
10) Finance
11) Wellbeing

1. Introduction to SAS

Who are SAS and what do we do?

The SAS (Student and Academic Services) department is comprised of a number of small teams that work together to ensure that students successfully complete their courses and, ultimately, graduate. SAS is comprised of Programme Administration/Advice (who maintain all student records, organize and run assessments and examinations, as well advise students at our ‘Advice Desk’), as well as Admissions, Careers, Data Management and Wellbeing.

While the department is comprised of different teams, each with their own responsibilities, generally speaking, we refer to ourselves as SAS (Student and Academic Services).

SAS (via our ‘Advice Desk’) should be your first port of call for your general queries on the courses offered by The Courtauld, as well as for your transcript requests, proof of student status requests, council tax exemption certificates, and your letters of introduction for archives, banks and libraries (to open a student account/get access as a student). The Programme Administration team will be able to discuss academic, learning and welfare support services on offer to you, in addition to queries about accommodation, health issues, immigration matters, financial support and careers/employment. All our staff have a wealth of experience gained from a number of industries including education/ higher education, finance, IT, government and research, to name but a few! If the team are unable to assist you, they will be able to signpost you to another department/organization that can help you.

So the ‘Advice Desk’ belongs to SAS – ‘Advice’ is not a separate team?

The ‘Advice Desk’ is owned by SAS and is run by the Programme Administration team, who are part of SAS.

If you are a BA/GD or Study Abroad student, you will be speaking with Yelena D’Attoma.

If you are an MA student, you will be speaking with Fahid Hussain.

If you are a PhD or Easels student, you will be speaking with Rachel Shaw.

Please email SAS@courtauld.ac.uk

Other members of the SAS team do not manage the Advice Desk. Should you need to speak to another member of the team, such as an Admissions Officer for instance, please refer to the above staff members, first.

Where is the SAS office?

SAS and the ‘Advice Desk’ is located on the 2nd floor of Vernon Square. The exact location of the office is signposted within the building.

 

 

 

 

How do we contact SAS?

For your general queries, you can speak to SAS staff members in person, at the ‘Advice Desk’ (appointments may be necessary until social distancing measures are no longer mandated by the UK government) from 9:30am – 04:30pm, Monday – Friday. You may also email the team on SAS@courtauld.ac.uk  or call 0203 9477 702, to speak to someone.

If you have a query that relates specifically to wellbeing support (which includes academic support – i.e. help with writing/ research/ organization and time-management, as well as free counselling), then please email wellbeing@courtauld.ac.uk to book a private, confidential appointment with a member of this team.

If you would like guidance on careers, help with writing a UK-style CV or preparing for an interview, then please email careers@courtauld.ac.uk . The Careers Advisor works part-time, on an appointment-only basis.

2. Contact information

I’m a BA/Graduate Diploma student. Is there a specific person I should speak to in SAS?

Yes. The Programme Administrator for these cohorts is Yelena D’Attoma. Please contact SAS@courtauld.ac.uk

I’m an MA student. Is there a specific person I should speak to in SAS?

Yes. The Programme Administrator for this cohort is Fahid Hussain. Please contact SAS@courtauld.ac.uk

I’m a PhD/ Easels student. Is there a specific person I should speak to in SAS?

Yes. The Programme Administrator for these cohorts is Rachel Shaw. Please contact SAS@courtauld.ac.uk

How can I get in touch with the Students’ Union? 

3. Official documentation

May I have a transcript? Do I have to pay?

Current students can obtain one copy of their transcript, for free. Further copies cost GBP 10.00 per copy, whether electronic or hard copy. To be clear, an electronic copy is a hard-copy that has been printed on official transcript paper, then scanned and attached to an email. Hard copies of transcripts will be placed in a transcript sleeve, not an envelope, if requested in person. Those requesting hard copies of transcripts to be mailed out will need to pay a postage fee (including the cost of an envelope):

  • For UK-domiciled addresses, the cost of postage using standard, Royal Mail delivery, is nil as this service is free to us.
  • Courier service to UK-domiciled addresses costs GBP 15.00.
  • Postage to non-UK-domiciled addresses costs a flat rate of GBP 15.00 and will only be sent by courier.

If needed, transcripts should ideally be requested at the end of a completed academic year to ensure that the grades for that academic year have been entered onto our system and then ratified (formally agreed) at that year’s exam board. We do not typically produce transcripts for students who have not completed at least one full academic year as there will not be any information to output on a transcript. Should you transfer out or require formal notification of your grades for the purpose of completing an internship for instance, please speak to the relevant Programme Administrator for your cohort, first, for guidance.

Once you have completed your qualification, you will automatically be provided with a transcript after graduation. Final transcripts will be sent to a student’s home address, unless a specific request has been made for it to be posted elsewhere.

Please note that The Courtauld does not subscribe to an electronic transcript-verification service such as ‘Digitary’. We only send transcripts as attachments to emails or via the post/ a courier service. If you are requesting that a transcript is sent securely, please speak to the relevant Programme Adminstrator before making your request.

How do I pay for my transcript and any associated postage cost (if applicable)?

Payment should be made via PayPal. The relevant Programme Administrator will provide payment instructions to you once they have confirmed your transcript can be produced.

May I request a copy of my degree certificate? Do I have to pay?

Degree certificates are produced by the University of London Degree Production Team. You may order a replacement copy directly from them by following these instructions. You will need to pay a fee of £40.00 (exclusive of postage) for a copy/ replacement degree certificate.

May I have my degree certificate certified? Do I have to pay?

Yes. Please contact the University of London Degree Production Team by following these instructions. The cost starts from £15.00 and you will need to provide the team with your original certificate. Please contact them for exact details.

May I have proof of student status? Do I have to pay?

We provide students with proof of their student status by issuing ‘student status letters’ which detail a student’s name, student i.d. number as well as details about their course and the start/end date of their course. These letters can be used for any purpose in which a student needs to show official record of their enrolment on a part-time or full-time higher education course.

Student status letters are free. Once students have completed enrolment, Programme Administrators will make them available to students.

If a student would like duplicate copy of their student status letter at any point during the year, they can request one by speaking to their Programme Administrator at the ‘Advice Desk’ or by emailing SAS on SAS@courtauld.ac.uk and providing their full name and student number.

May I have a Council tax exemption letter? Do I have to pay?

We provide students with council-tax exemption letters which are very similar to student status letters. More or less the same information is displayed on both the student status letter and a council-tax exemption letter. The difference is the layout and the wording used.

Council tax exemption letters are free. Once students have completed enrolment, Programme Administrators will make them available to students.

If a student would like a duplicate copy of their council tax letter at any point during the year, they can request one by speaking to their Programme Administrator at the ‘Advice Desk’ or by emailing SAS on SAS@courtauld.ac.uk and providing their full name and student number.

May I have a letter of introduction to an archive/ bank/ library? Do I have to pay?

Students who wish to access a private archive, open a UK student bank account or access a private collection within a library, may be asked to get a letter of introduction from their higher education provider to explain their reasons for accessing material/ proving their student status. If you are asked for a letter of introduction, then please speak to the relevant Programme Administrator for your cohort/course.

For a letter of introduction to a private archive/ library, students will need to provide the full name and contact (postal) address of the organization whose collections they are requesting access to. Letters will not be mailed out on a student’s behalf. Instead, the letter (no envelope included) will be provided directly to the student and it would be the student’s responsibility to pass this letter on to the organization managing the archive.

With banks, some banks do accept student status letters as proof that an individual is eligible for a UK student bank account; others request a formal letter of introduction. Students will need to provide the full name and contact (postal) address of the specific branch they are requesting an account in. Letters will not be mailed out on a student’s behalf.  Instead, the letter (no envelope included) will be provided to the student and it would be the student’s responsibility to pass this letter on to the branch they wish to open an account in.

May I request a bespoke letter? For example, I’m having issues with my landlord, will you write to them on my behalf?

We do not provide bespoke letters for students. The only letters we provide are student status letters, council tax exemption letters and letters of introduction so students can access archives/ private collections at libraries or open a UK student bank account.

Under no circumstances will we provide a bespoke letter on behalf of a student.

When do I get my student I.D. card? Where do I collect it from?

After completing enrolment, all new students will be provided with their student cards, a lanyard and a transparent, hard-plastic card holder in which to carry their student I.D. card. Student cards will be printed by the Security team after SAS have confirmed which students require cards. Once the cards have been printed, either Security or SAS will email students on their Courtauld email addresses, with instructions on when and where to collect their cards.

If you are not a new student, you do not need a new student card and will not automatically be provided with a new one as your card should be valid until you graduate.

I have lost my student I.D. card. Can I have a new one. Do I have to pay?

If your student I.D. card has been lost or stolen, then please email SAS@courtauld.ac.uk with your full name and student I.D. number so we can have you issued with a new one. We will have the lost/stolen I.D. card deactivated so that it can’t be used by another person, if found. The cost for a replacement I.D. card is £10.00. This fee can be paid either in cash at the ‘Advice Desk’ or via PayPal. The relevant Programme Administrator will provide you with the PayPal details when you’ve contacted them about ordering a replacement.

Can I have more information on the EU settlement scheme?

Guidance on the EU Settlement Scheme application, eligibility and other useful advice can be found here.

We will be able to provide a Student Status letter after you have enrolled to aid your application. 

When will The Courtauld release official letters of attendance / enrolment?

Once you have fully enrolled and have a Courtauld email account and access to eVision, you will be able to request these official letters.  We will only provide electronic copies of these types of letters and these will be sent to your Courtauld email address.   

4. Qualifications

What is each of my modules worth and how is each year of my degree weighted?

BA History of Art:

BA1

  • Foundations course = 2.0 course units (50%)
  • Language course = 1.0 course unit (25%)
  • Topic course 1 = 0.5 course unit (12.5%)
  • Topic course 2 = 0.5 course unit (12.5%)

Total = 4 course units (100%)

Students must pass 4 course units at BA1 to progress onto the next year of study. A pass is equivalent to 40% or higher for academic year 20-21. If a student fails a course, they will be asked to re-sit any final exam (or submit their summative coursework if the course is not assessed through an exam) in the re-sit period which falls in the September preceding their next academic year.

N.B If a student does not complete their language course in the first year (provided by and at the London School of Economics Language Center), then a student may be asked to complete it before being able to progress onto the next year of study. As The Courtauld pays the LSE a fee for them to teach our students a language course, should the language course not be completed in BA1, then it will be the student’s responsibility to pay for the course.

BA2

  • Assessed essay = 0.7 course unit (17.5%)
  • Autumn constellation = 1.0 course unit (25%)
  • Frameworks course = 1.3 course unit (32.5%)
  • Spring constellation = 1.0 course unit (25%)

Total = 4 course units (100%)

Students must pass at least 3.5 course units at BA2 to progress onto their year of study. A pass is equivalent to 40% or higher for academic year 20-21. If a student fails a course, they will be asked to re-sit any final exam (or submit their summative coursework if the course is not assessed through an exam) in the re-sit period which falls in the September preceding their next academic year.

N.B. A student will not normally be permitted to progress onto their third and final year of study if grades from BA1 and BA2 indicate that a student is unlikely to be able to be awarded a degree by the end of their third year. In cases where this is likely to happen, SAS and the Academic Registrar will meet with the student to discuss the options available to them so that they can ultimately graduate.

BA3

  • Assessed essay =1.0 course unit (25%)
  • Lessons in Critical Interpretation = 1.0 course unit (25%)
  • Special option 1 = 1.0 course unit (25%)
  • Special option 2 = 1.0 course unit (25%)

Students must pass all 4 course units to be awarded their degree and to graduate. A pass is equivalent to 40% or higher for academic year 20-21. If a student fails a course, they will be asked to re-sit any final exam (or submit their summative coursework if the course is not assessed through an exam) in the re-sit period which falls in the September preceding their next academic year. Students who have to re-sit an exam or re-submit any summative coursework in the September re-sit period will not graduate in the July. They will graduate once their marks have been ratified and they can formally be awarded a degree from us.

A BA degree is weighted as follows: BA2 (25%), BA3 (75%).


Graduate Diploma:

  • Autumn constellation (a BA2 course) – worth 30% of the diploma
  • Assessed essay (a BA2/3 element) – worth 20% of the diploma
  • Spring constellation (a BA2 course) – worth 30% of the diploma
  • Foundations (a BA1 course) – worth 20% of the diploma

The pass mark for the GD is 50%.

To be awarded the GD, students must achieve at least 50% in 70% of all the components (at least 3 of the 4 components that make up the GD).

The overall classification of a GD will be displayed as ‘Pass – Eligible for MA’, ‘Pass’ or ‘Fail’ on the transcript/ qualification certificate.


MA History of Art:

Essay 1 – worth 15% of final degree and is the equivalent of 27 credits

Essay 2 – worth 20% of final degree and is the equivalent of 36 credits

Virtual Exhibition – worth 15% of final degree and is the equivalent of 27 credits

Dissertation – worth 50% of final degree and is the equivalent of 90 credits

How do you calculate my degree classification?

BA History of Art:

One average will be calculated for BA2 and one for BA3. The averages will be weighted 3:1 in favour of the 3rd year. The final degree classification will be calculated using the formula 1x + 3y/ 4 = c, where x is the second-year average, y is the third-year average and c is the overall average, which is the figure used to determine a student’s degree classification.

Graduate Diploma:

To be awarded the GD, students must achieve at least 50% in 70% of all the components (at least 3 of the 4 components that make up the GD). The pass mark for the GD is 50% or higher.

MA History of Art:

To be awarded their degree, students must obtain a pass or higher, overall. The pass mark for the MA is 50% or higher.

What are the degree classifications?

BA History of Art students could be awarded the following degree classifications depending on your overall average:

  1. First (≥ 70%)
  2. Upper Second-Class Honours (60-69%)
  3. Lower Second-Class Honours (50-59%)
  4. Pass (40-49%)

If a student fails, they will not be awarded a degree. A student who fails should seek guidance from their Programme Administrator.

Graduate Diploma students could be awarded the following classifications:

  1. Pass – Eligible for the MA
  2. Pass
  3. Fail

If a student fails, they will not be awarded a degree. A student who fails should seek guidance from their Programme Administrator.

MA History of Art students could be awarded the following classifications:

  1. High Distinction (≥80%)
  2. Distinction (70-79%)
  3. Merit (60-69%)
  4. Pass (50-59%)
  5. Fail (˂50%)

If a student fails, they will not be awarded a degree. A student who fails should seek guidance from their Programme Administrator.

If my overall average is borderline, will you automatically round-up my degree classification? For instance, I’m 0.5% away from obtaining a First. Will you award me a First degree?

Students should refer to The Courtauld’s general regulations/ policies on degrees available on our website for an explanation on what we do in cases where students obtain a borderline grade. Students may also contact the relevant Programme Administrator for their cohort/course for re-assurance.

N.B. Our regulations and policies are currently being re-written. Updated versions will be uploaded in due course.

5. Assignments

I’m not able to submit my assignment by its submission deadline. May I have an extension?

For formative assignments, students can request an extension from the class teacher. However, the teacher will inform SAS that the student has been given an extension.

For summative assignments, students may only request an extension from the relevant Programme Adminsitrator for their cohort/course. A form will need to be completed and this form, as well as details of the extension request/ outcome, will be filed and stored. SAS only give students an extension to their submission deadline if the reason for requesting an extension falls in line with our extenuating circumstances policy. To read the policy and confirm whether or not you are able to request an extension, please access this webpage and scroll down the page until you reach the ‘Student Policies and Procedures’ section. If you have further questions about requesting an extension, contact the relevant Programme Administrator for your course.

To be clear, an extension request is also known as a claim for extenuating circumstances or a request for the late submission of coursework. These terms are interchangeable and all refer to the same process.

Is there a deadline for me to request an extension for a submission deadline?

If, after reading the extenuating circumstances policy, you are eligible to apply for an extension, then students should email the relevant Programme Administrator for their cohort at least 2 days prior to an assignment submission deadline. If a student is unable to request an extension before the submission deadline (as they were ill and in the hospital, for example), then they should speak to the Programme Administrator for their cohort and explain their personal circumstances. In some cases, a request for an extension submitted post-submission deadline can be authorized by the relevant Programme Administrator. Any late penalties applied to an assignment submitted late, without an approved extension, could be waived if a claim for extenuating circumstances would have been authorized had the request been received before the assignment submission deadline. If in doubt, contact the relevant Programme Administrator for guidance.

What is the difference between a formative and summative assignment?

A formative assignment does have to be submitted but its grade doesn’t count towards your final score for the course it’s being submitted for.

A summative assignment does have to be submitted and its grade will count towards your final score for the course it’s being submitted for.

Some of my assignments are formative. Do I still have to submit them?

Yes. All course assignments are mandatory, not optional. Failure to submit formative work could delay your progression onto your next year of study and students may be asked to submit all outstanding work before they can enter the next year of their course.

What are the penalties for submitting an assignment late?

For formative assignments submitted past their submission deadline, you may receive a grade but no feedback. The grade will indicate your level of academic achievement for that piece of coursework, however, no feedback will be provided to advise you of what you did well and how you could improve.

For summative assignments submitted past their submission deadline, late penalties in the form of deductions to the overall mark for that piece of work will be applied, as follows:

  • 3 points off total mark deducted for any submission received after the 15:00 deadline on the day of submission. Submissions will be classified as being received on the day of submission if they are uploaded by 11:59pm.
  • 5 points off total mark deducted for any submission received from 12:00am (midnight) on the day of submission until 11:59pm the next day.
  • A further 1 point per day will be deducted from the total mark, for a period of up to 5 days (Monday to Friday). After 5 days, an essay will be noted as a ‘non-submission’. SAS will provide a re-submission deadline for a candidate to hand-in their essay. The candidate’s mark will be capped at a pass (40% for AY 20-21) unless the quality of their assignment is beneath a passing grade, in which case the assignment will fail.

Examples:

Deadline: 15:00pm on 01/01/2020.

  • Student A submits their essay at 15:05pm on 01/01/2020. Their grade receives a 3-point deduction. If they scored 75, their grade will be brought down to 72.
  • Student B submits their essay at 11:59pm on 01/01/2020. Their grade receives a 3-point deduction. If they scored 60, their grade will be brought down to 57.
  • Student C submits their essay at 12:01am on 02/01/2020. Their grade receives a 5-point deduction. If they scored 80, their grade will be brought down to 75.
  • Student D submits their essay at 09:45am on 02/01/2020. Their grade receives a 5-point deduction. If they scored 55, their grade will be brought down to 50.
  • Student E submits their essay at 17:51 on 04/01/2020. Their grade receives a 7-point deduction. If they scored 67, their grade will be brought down to 60.
  • Student F doesn’t submit an essay. SAS will provide the student with a new submission deadline. Their assignment will be capped at a pass (40% for AY 20-21) unless the quality of their assignment is beneath a passing grade, in which case the assignment will fail.
Who is responsible for applying late penalties?

The relevant Programme Administrator is responsible for applying late penalties to a student’s grades. Late penalties are applied after a student’s marks are received and logged on our system. So, students will receive their original marks and then when the relevant Programme Administrator has applied any late penalties to work that had been submitted late, will receive an email stating what the late penalty is/ how many marks have been deducted from the mark obtained for the late piece of coursework.

Can I appeal a late penalty?

No. Late penalties are applied to assignments per our regulations. Part of a student’s responsibility is to submit mandatory coursework by its deadline date. Keeping to deadlines is essential as our courses are rigorous and planned to enable students to build on their knowledge throughout the year. Each submission deadline is planned to leave both staff and students enough time to manage their workload and complete research, writing up and marking. Failure to submit work on time has a knock-on effect; not only will students have extra work to complete in a shorter amount of time, but academics and SAS will also experience delays. Late penalties are in place as a deterrent and to encourage students to submit work on time.

I’m having difficulty writing an essay and managing my workload. What can I do?

The Wellbeing team employs staff who can assist you with academic, organization and time-management skills. You can book an appointment with an Academic Skills Tutor and a Specialist Study Skills Tutor by emailing Wellbeing in the first instance. Wellbeing can be contacted using wellbeing@courtauld.ac.uk

Students can also enlist the support of our two Royal Literary Fellows. Students can book an appointment to see them by emailing rick.stroud@courtauld.ac.uk or lydia.syson@courtauld.ac.uk

I’ve submitted two assignments late and I feel like I’m unable to meet another, upcoming deadline. What do I do?

If you are falling behind and struggling with your workload, email the relevant Programme Administrator for your cohort. Your Programme Administrator, in conjunction with your Personal Tutor will have you complete an ‘Academic Recovery Plan’. We will set you new deadlines and possibly refer you to the two skills tutors who work for us, should you require support with writing/ organizational skills. The ‘Academic Recovery Plan’ itself and the terms of the plan will be explained to you when you complete it.

I have a disability. What can you do to support me?

If you have any type of disability, you may contact the Wellbeing team, your Programme Administrator and your Personal Tutor. The Wellbeing team will initiate a support plan for you based on your needs. This could be automatic extensions to all submission deadlines that you have, as one example. Your Programme Administrator will record any reasonable adjustments made to accommodate you during your studies. Your Personal Tutor will also act as moral/ pastoral support and, along with your Programme Administrator, a source of guidance during your studies with us. All disability declarations are dealt with confidentially.

Where do I submit my work?

Unless otherwise explicitly stated, all assignments should be submitted to the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) using Turnitin on the relevant assignment submission portal for the course the assignment is being submitted for. For example, a BA1 student would like to submit their Foundations essay 1. To do so, they would log on to the VLE using their Courtauld email address and password, go to the Foundations course page, find the ‘assignment submissions’ page and click on the Turnitin portal for essay 1.

Students will receive a ‘receipt’ to confirm successful submission of their coursework. If a receipt is not received, then a student’s work may not have successfully uploaded and their work may be classed as late or as a ‘non-submission’. If in doubt, email the relevant Programme Administrator for your cohort, for verification.

What happens if I have trouble with submitting my work on Turnitin?

If a student experiences any issues with submitting work, they should identify the error, send a screenshot of the error message displayed on their screen and email it to the relevant Programme Administrator for their course. Kindly note that we do not accept technical difficulties as an excuse for late submission of coursework. Students should therefore submit work with enough time to contact their Programme Administrator and resolve any submission issues.

How long does it take for my assignments/exams to be marked and my grades to be given to me?

Your class teacher has 14 days from the submission deadline to mark assignments/exams and return marks/feedback to SAS/ students. Although this doesn’t happen often, in cases where there is a delay in returning marks for whatever reason, the class teacher will inform SAS and the relevant Programme Administrator will update their cohort of students. As work is submitted on the VLE, marks and feedback will, ordinarily, be displayed on the VLE.

The only marks and feedback that are not displayed on the VLE are those for the following:

  • BA2/BA3/GD assessed essay
  • BA2 Frameworks 48-hour take-home paper
  • BA2 Frameworks reflective essay
  • BA3 Lessons in Critical Interpretation final assignment
  • Examinations (Jan and May)
  • MA dissertation

Apart from the January exams, the marks and feedback for the above will be given to students via a ‘results email’/ ‘feedback form’ after those marks have been ratified (formally agreed) at the July exam board.

6. Concerns and complaints

I’m unhappy with my grade. Can I have my work re-marked?

No. We do not have work re-marked. Our academic staff receive regular teacher-training and are experienced examiners/markers. We also have processes in place to ensure that marks are awarded according to marking criteria that has been agreed via the Teaching and Learning Committee (TLC). Moreover, each year we hire External Examiners to look through how and what we have taught during the academic year; part of the External Examiners’ role is to look at the marks and feedback that we provide to students and establish whether what we are doing is accurate, consistent and fair. Upon receiving our External Examiners’ reports, the institution then has a Quality Assurance Meeting to ensure that all our processes and procedures are of a high standard and that we make any improvements to how we work, based on the recommendations and best practice suggested by the External Examiners. As we have a number of safeguards in place, students should rest assured that their work is marked fairly and their marks are indicative of their level of academic achievement.

I don’t like the class I’ve been assigned to. Can I change?

No. We don’t allow students to change classes.

In BA1, students are assigned classes by the relevant Programme Administrator for their cohort. Students cannot switch classes as this has implications on student numbers and on the timetable. Moreover, we need to ensure that class sizes are relatively equal, especially while social distancing measures are mandated by the UK government. As some classes are more popular than others (typically the Modern and Contemporary classes), we can’t have the majority of students taking the popular ones and minimal numbers of students in the others.

In BA2, BA3 and at GD, students are permitted to state a preference for the classes they would like to take. However, no student is guaranteed to be allocated to any of their preferred classes.

The MA course works differently. If an MA student is unhappy with what they are studying, they should speak to their Programme Adminstrator for guidance in the first instance.

I have an issue with something in one of the classes I’m taking. What do I do?

Any concerns a student has with their class should be discussed, informally, with the class teacher in the first instance. In the event that a student would like to escalate their concerns, they should then speak to their Personal Tutor and Programme Administrator. If further escalation is required, their Personal Tutor and Programme Administrator will advise the student of the complaints process.

I would like to make a formal complaint. How do I go about doing this?

In all cases, we ask that students try to resolve any issues they may have, informally. A student can speak to a number of staff for guidance when dealing with any issues they may have (Personal Tutor/ Programme Administrator/ Students Union). If the issue cannot be informally resolved, then a student may make a formal complaint, in writing, to the Academic Registrar, Elizabeth Harris (the Head of Student and Academic Services) via Academic.Registry@courtauld.ac.uk .

Kindly note that students may be asked to try and informally resolve their issue before the Academic Registrar is able to respond to their complaint. Students should not write to the Dean or the Director without first speaking to their Personal Tutor/ Programme Administrator/ Student Union. SAS staff will escalate complaints on behalf of a student. Any complaints brought directly to the Dean or Director will be re-directed to the Academic Registrar, first. The Full Student Complaints Policy is on The Courtauld website under Student Policies and this gives full details of the steps to resolve any complaint.  Students are asked to complete a form (on the website) detailing their complaint in full and what action they would like to see as a resolution.

7. Systems

What is eVision and how do I use it?

eVision is a platform that is linked to our internal system which students can use to update their address and personal details without having to physically come to the SAS ‘Advice Desk’. eVision is also where students will input their assessed essay/ dissertation title. This title will appear on a student’s official transcript.

Access to eVision is granted after enrollment. To access eVision, click this link. Students will log in using their Courtauld email address and password.

Should you have trouble accessing your eVision account, please contact evision@courtauld.ac.uk for assistance.

Who do I contact if I have an issue with eVision?

Please email evision@courtauld.ac.uk.

The eVision team are members of SAS; eVision is not a separate team external to The Courtauld.

What is the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) and how do I access it?

The VLE (also known as Moodle) is our online platform which staff and students use to display information related to courses and support services, for instance. The VLE is also where students should submit their assignments. Students are provided with access to general areas (which all users have access to) and the courses they are enrolled on. Only areas relevant to a student will be displayed. So, each student’s VLE homepage will be different and dependent on the course they are taking.

Access to the VLE will be provided once students have completed enrolment. Students should log in using their Courtauld email address and password. The first time a student accesses the site, they will need to use the password assigned to them, before being prompted to change it.

When student submits assignments they should go to the course page the assignment is being submitted for, then the ‘Assignment Submission’ page, followed by the relevant Turnitin submission portal for their assignment, i.e. ‘Foundations > Assignment Submissions > Essay 1’.

For help with using the VLE, please contact Ruthine Burton, our VLE specialist on vle@courtauld.ac.uk . Kindly note that Ruthine works part-time, only.

What is Open Athens (a.k.a Athens) and how do I use it?

Open Athens is an authentication system that allows authorized users to access numerous electronic resources such as academic journals. Information on how to access electronic resources via Open Athens (a.k.a Athens) can be obtained, here. Should students require further guidance on using Athens or accessing online resources, please contact Library staff on booklib@courtauld.ac.uk

May I get some training to develop my digital and information skills?

Yes. The Library will assist you. You can find further information here, and email booklib@courtauld.ac.uk with your request.

I have an IT issue. May I get some assistance?

Students may request assistance from our IT support team for Courtauld-related IT issues by emailing support@courtauld.ac.uk . Kindly note that IT support will only be able to assist with Courtauld-related IT issues, such as trouble accessing Wi-Fi on site, for example. It is at the discretion of IT support as to which issues they are able to assist students with. Personal IT issues should not be directed to this team.

Can I record classes?

Provided that the class teacher gives their consent, students are permitted to record classes. If students are making video recordings as opposed to just voice recordings, they need to be mindful not to capture another student without their consent.

Students who require a Dictaphone (as part of a study support plan) may request one from their Programme Administrator in SAS.

How long after I graduate will my Courtauld email account remain active? Will I still retain access to the VLE?

Students retain access to their Courtauld email account for 1 year from the date of graduation. Students should ensure all important emails/ documents are saved/ forwarded on before their account is deactivated.

After graduation, VLE access will be revoked. Access to the VLE is exclusive to enrolled students.

If I suspend my studies, will I retain access to my Courtauld email account and the VLE until I return?

Yes. If you suspend your studies, you may still use your Courtauld email account.

Access to the VLE, however, is granted on a case-by-case basis and is not guaranteed when a student has suspended. Students who suspend but would like to retain access to the VLE need to seek permission from SAS via the Programme Administrator for their course.

If I withdraw from my studies, will I retain access to my Courtauld email account?

No. Once a student withdraws, they are no longer our student and do not have the right to access any of our systems. They will lose access to their Courtauld email address from the date their withdrawal is processed on our system.

8. Examinations

When will I find out about my exams and be given an exam timetable?

Students will be emailed their exam timetables to their Courtauld email address approximately 4 weeks before their exams. If there are delays, students will be informed by the staff member responsible for arranging our exams. This would be Rachel Shaw in SAS.

Can I view past papers to help me prepare for an exam?

Past papers can be viewed online on the VLE. Please check the ‘Information for Students’ and ‘Resources’ sections or contact Rachel Shaw in SAS, to obtain copies.

Can I view past re-sit papers to help me prepare for an exam?

No. Re-sit papers are confidential and can’t be used to prepare for an exam. Students can view past non-re-sit papers to help them, but not re-sit papers.

Who do I speak to if I have questions about my examinations?

Students should email SAS@courtauld.ac.uk with any questions about their examinations.

9. Library

Can I order a copy of a dissertation from the Courtauld Library?

Staff and students are able to request a copy of a dissertation from the library by emailing booklib@courtauld.ac.uk

10. Finance

How do I pay my tuition fees?

How do I pay my tuition fees?

Students should email AR.Receivable@courtauld.ac.uk with queries on tuition fees.

Is there any financial support available for students on a Courtauld study trip?

Only BA3 and MA students are eligible to obtain a study trip grant (grants do not need to be repaid) for a trip that forms a part of their course. Students should contact the relevant Programme Administrator for their cohort for further information and a copy of the form required to claim the study trip grant.

Should I purchase travel insurance for my study trip?

The Courtauld has travel insurance to cover our staff and students on study trips. When making a claim for a study trip grant, students will also be required to apply for Courtauld travel insurance. The cost of the insurance policy is borne by The Courtauld and not the student.

What if my trip is cancelled? Do I have to repay the grant?

In the event that a study trip is cancelled, then yes, a grant must be repaid. A study trip grant must only be used towards a pre-planned and authorized study trip. If the trip does not go ahead, any money given to students does need to be returned to The Courtauld

11. Wellbeing

Do you offer counselling services?

We initially offer up to 6 counselling sessions for students. If further sessions are required, we can offer them. Our counsellors are experienced and fully qualified. They are also members of the following professional bodies: The British Association for Counselling (BACP) and The United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy (UKCP). Counselling sessions are available on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 10:00 to 15:00.  20-miute drop-in sessions are also available on Mondays and Tuesday from 15:00 to 15:30 and on Wednesdays at 15:00.

To book sessions, please email wellbeing@courtauld.ac.uk – your counselling sessions will be in Meeting Room 2, 2nd floor of Vernon Square.

Online learning is challenging for my mental health / wellbeing. Are you offering enhanced wellbeing services?

We are expanding our Wellbeing and Counselling Service to students as we recognise the high level of anxiety among students at the current time.  Information is available on the VLE and Student Handbook on the services provided. 

Contact wellbeing@courtauld.ac.uk to discuss how we can best help you 

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