CANCELLED: Light made and light received: Architectural polychromy in northern France in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries - The Courtauld Institute of Art

CANCELLED: Light made and light received: Architectural polychromy in northern France in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries

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CANCELLED: Light made and light received: Architectural polychromy in northern France in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries

The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London

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Polychromy in the Infirmary of Ourscamp. Photo: Tom Nickson.

  • Wednesday 14 February 2018
    PLEASE NOTE: This Date Has Passed
    5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

    Research Forum Seminar Room, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London, WC2R 0RN

Speaker

  • Professor Arnaud Timbert - University of Picardy Jules-Verne

Organised by

  • Dr Tom Nickson - The Courtauld Institute of Art

Light in the Gothic period (twelfth and thirteenth centuries) has been the subject of numerous studies. These have drawn heavily on the writings of abbot Suger and focus particularly on stained glasses or liturgical objects. Aniconic polychromy is very rarely considered. This lecture will therefore explore the relationship between light and architectural polychromy. It will also consider the atmosphere and luminous identities generated by the use of local pigments.

 

Arnaud Timbert is Professor of Art History of the Middle Ages (University of Picardy Jules-Verne). He is a member of the Scientific Council of the International Stained Glass Center (CVMA). With the support of this institution, he sponsored a collective and interdisciplinary work on Chartres Cathedral (2014). He has also directed several works on materials and construction techniques (abbey church of Vézelay and Noyon cathedral) and restoration (castles of Pierrefonds and Pupetières). Whilst a fellow at the INHA (2015-2017) he also inaugurated a study of the historiography of architecture with a critical edition of the correspondence of Louis Grodecki (2018).

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