Associate Scholars

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Associate Scholars

Associate Scholars

The Associate Scholars group is made up of, predominantly, early-career researchers based at The Courtauld in conjunction with distinguished Visiting Professors.  Postdoctoral Fellows working on a range of topics and Visiting Lecturers and Visiting Professors teaching courses at The Courtauld form the core membership of this group.  The Associate Scholars meet at least once a term giving an opportunity for the members to offer presentations and share knowledge about their research.

2013-14

Jocelyn Anderson

Jocelyn Anderson is a visiting lecturer. She completed her PhD on country-house guidebooks in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries in May 2013; while studying, she was supervised by Dr Christine Stevenson and received grants from the Yale Center for British Art and the Canadian Centre for Architecture. In 2013-14, she is teaching ‘Neoclassical Architecture and Design in London’ for first-year BA students, and she is co-teaching the MA Special Option ‘Modernity and Antiquity in British Architecture, 1615 – 1815’. She is also an assistant editor of Architectural History, and in January 2014 she will take up a postdoctoral fellowship at The Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art.


Charlotte Ashby 

Charlotte was awarded her PhD in 2007 by the University of St Andrews for a thesis examining the intersection of nationalist and modernist aspirations in turn-of-the-century Finnish architecture. She went on to hold the post of Postdoctoral Research Fellow on theViennese Café Project at the Royal College of Art. She is editor and contributor to a forthcoming collection of essays: The Viennese Café and fin-de-siecle Culture, Berghahn 2013. Other recent publications include ‘Nation-building and Design: Finnish Textiles and the work of the Friends of Finnish Handicrafts’, Journal of Design History, 23:4, 2010; pp. 351-365.


Thomas Balfe


Ana Balona de Oliveira

Ana Balona de Oliveira completed her PhD in Modern and Contemporary Art, funded by the Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT, Portugal), at The Courtauld in 2012. She wrote her dissertation on the artwork of the South African and Portuguese artist Ângela Ferreira (b. Maputo, Mozambique, 1958), and has been interested in questions of identity and difference, feminisms, displacement, migration and globalisation. Ana published essays in Third Text,Mute, Fillip and in exhibition catalogues, and lectured at The Courtauld, Wimbledon College of Art, Westminster University, the University of Porto and other institutions. Ana still teaches at the Courtauld, and is now undertaking her post-doctoral research at the University of Lisbon and the New University of Lisbon, also funded by the FCT, on narratives of empire, post-colonialism, migration and globalisation in contemporary art. As a Visiting Lecturer at The Courtauld, Ana is teaching the MA course Twentieth-Century Sculpture: Production and Perception, with Visiting Professor Anne Wagner, and an undergraduate course on the impact of migration and diaspora on contemporary art in Britain. Ana is also an independent curator.


Katie Faulkner

Katie Faulkner has recently completed her PhD at the Courtauld Institute of Art. She specialises in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century British sculpture and its relationship with visual and popular culture. She is a visiting lecturer on the MA course, The Aesthetic Body: Science, Aestheticism and the image of the Body in British Art and also teaches an undergraduate course on modern sculpture in London. Katie is also a public programmes educator at the Courtauld Gallery and currently edits the Courtauld postgraduate journal immediations.


Ellery Foutch

Ellery is the Terra Foundation for American Art Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow 2013-14. She recently completed a two-year Mellon fellowship at the Center for the Humanities, University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she also taught classes in the art history department (2011-2013). She received her PhD in the History of Art from the University of Pennsylvania in 2011 with a dissertation entitled “Arresting Beauty: The Perfectionist Impulse of Peale’s Butterflies, Heade’s Hummingbirds, Blaschka’s Flowers, and Sandow’s Body.” Her research has been supported by grants and fellowships from the Wyeth Foundation, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Philadelphia Area Center for the History of Science, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and American Council of Learned Societies. She earned her MA from the Williams College Graduate Program in the History of Art and her BA in Art History from Wellesley College. She is currently working on a book manuscript focused on nineteenth-century ideas about perfection and its preservation and is a co-editor of the “Object Lessons” column for the online journal Common-place. While at The Courtauld she is also teaching a BA level 3 class on art and natural history of the Americas, utilizing London collections.


Christine Gardner


Pia Gottschaller

Pia Gottschaller took a BA in art history at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität in Munich and trained at The Courtauld Institute of Art to become a painting conservator (Dip 1997), then worked at the Harvard University Art Museums, Cambridge, and at The Menil Collection, Houston, where she participated in the conservation of the Rothko Chapel murals. She received her PhD in 2003 from Technische Universität Munich for a thesis on the artistic process of Blinky Palermo. Subsequently, she worked as Associate Conservator at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, followed by a Postdoc Research Fellowship at Bibliotheca Hertziana, Max-Planck-Institut für Kunstgeschichte in Rome, and the position of Assistant Fine Arts Director at German Academy Villa Massimo, Rome. Her research interests focus on issues of technical art history, in particular with regard to postwar and contemporary European and American artistic practices.


Chris Green


Nicholas Herman

Nicholas Herman specialises in French and Italian painting and manuscript illumination of the period around 1500. He holds the Samuel H. Kress Foundation Institutional Fellowship at the Courtauld for the 2012-14 academic years. He recently completed his PhD, a study of the French court painter Jean Bourdichon (1457-1521), at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts, where he also received an MA in 2008 after completing undergraduate studies at the University of Toronto in 2006. He has previously held Swarzenski and Rousseau fellowships at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (2010-12), a visiting fellowship at the Sir John Soane’s Museum, and a doctoral fellowship from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. Between 2007 and 2010, he worked as Curatorial Assistant in the Department of Medieval & Renaissance Manuscripts at the Pierpont Morgan Library and Museum, New York. His article ‘Excavating the Page: Virtuosity and Illusionism in Italian Book Illumination, 1460-1520’ appeared in Word & Image in 2011, and he has contributed to the recent France 1500 and Tours 1500 exhibitions.


Susan Jones

Susan Jones wrote her PhD at The Courtauld on Jan van Eyck. From 1994 to 1996, she was Assistant Curator at The National Gallery, London, and from 1998–2001 Old Master Society Fellow in the Department of European Painting at The Art Institute of Chicago. She has published widely on Jan van Eyck and is a co-author of Northern European and Spanish Paintings before 1600 in the Art Institute of Chicago: A Catalogue of the Collection( Yale University Press, 2008).


 

Liz Kim

Liz Kim specialises in late 20th century art and contemporary art, particularly in the areas of criticism, market, interdisciplinarity, globalisation, and modernism in the late 20th century. She is finishing her PhD thesis on the art of the 1980s in New York, focusing on media differentiation and critical narrative, and she has been organising research events at the Courtauld that address globalisation and interdisciplinarity. She has worked with various art organisations on special projects, including the Serpentine Gallery, the Showroom, and the Gwangju Cultural Foundation. She has planned and taught courses about modern and contemporary art at University College London and the Courtauld Institute.


Sara Knelman

Sara Knelman is a Canadian writer and curator based in London. Her PhD research at the Courtauld, supervised by Julian Stallabrass, explores photographic exhibition in public art museums in Britain and the US from 1967 to 2007. She was Curator of Contemporary Art (2006-2009) at the Art Gallery of Hamilton, Canada, and Talks Programmer (2012) at The Photographers’ Gallery, London. In 2013-2014 she is Visiting Lecturer at the Courtauld and Consultant Lecturer at Sotheby’s Institute of Art. She has led a Courtauld Summer School course on Contemporary Photography and lectured at Christie’s Education and the Notre Dame London School. Sara writes regularly about photography and contemporary art, served as a jury member for theAimia-AGO Photography Prize (2012) and Magenta Foundation’s Flash Forward prize for emerging photographers (2013), and is a contributing editor toEither/And, an online collaborative project exploring issues in photography and new media.


Sara Beth Levany

Sara Beth Levavy recently completed her Ph.D. in the Department of Art & Art History at Stanford University. Titled ‘Immediate Mediation: A Narrative of the Newsreel and the Film’, her thesis looks to the interwar newsreel as narrative and historical object. At The Courtauld, Levavy is teaching a BA3 Special Option course in autumn 2013 called The Spectacle of (Popular) Media. The course considers avant-garde art and media production between 1880 and 1960, exploring the ways in which photographers, filmmakers, the mass print media, and other fine artists experimented with the nature of medium. In 2006 Levavy published‘Land of Liberty in the World of Tomorrow’ in Film History and from 2008-2010 worked on a project with the George Eastman House in Rochester, NY and the Cineteca del Friuli in Friuli, Italy to research the filmography of the Davide Turconi Film Frame Collection.


Caroline Levitt

Caroline Levitt specialises in French art and literature of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; she completed her PhD on the relationship between Guillaume Apollinaire and André Breton as manifested through their involvement and interest in artistic practices such as graffiti, illustration, cinema and the collection and construction of objects. Her article ‘Screening poetry: Guillaume Apollinaire, André Breton and experimental cinema’ appeared in the 2008 issue of Immediations. Over the next year, Caroline plans to develop interests emerging from her doctoral research, in particular her work on Le Corbusier, which she hopes will form the basis of a book. Other research interests include collaborations between artists, writers and craftsmen and the relationships between literature and sculpture. Caroline is a visiting lecturer at The Courtauld Institute of Art.


Alister Mill

Alister Mill was until recently Associate Research Fellow at the University of Exeter for the AHRC-funded research project Painting for The Salon? The French State, Artists and Academy, 1830-1852. He is co-editing a volume of proceedings from a recent bilingual conference on the Salon to be published by Peter Lang in 2014, and is the curator of the exhibition The Paris Fine Art Salon currently on display at the University of Exeter. He is co-creator (with Dr Harriet Griffiths) of the Database of Salon Artists, which launches in November 2013. Produced in association with the Archives des Musées Nationaux in the Louvre, the database provides a comprehensive online record of over 81,000 artworks by some 9000 artists submitted to the Salon from 1827 to 1850. Alister completed his doctoral thesis on the 19th-century artist Alfred Philippe Roll at the Courtauld, where he has been a Visiting Lecturer since 2009.


John Milner


Natasha Morris


Natalia Murray

Natalia Murray was born in St Petersburg where she read Art History for five years at the Academy of Fine Arts.  In 1998 she completed her doctoral thesis on C18th English Mezzotint Engravings at the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg. Her interest in the Russian Avant-Garde was always there, but was brought to the surface when she met the grand-daughter of one of the most influential Russian art critics of the early C20th, Nikolay Punin, and began to write a book about him and his struggle to keep Avant-Garde art alive in Russia after the Revolution. Natalia’s biography of Nikolay Punin, ‘The Unsung Hero of the Russian Avant-Garde. The Life and Times of Nikolay Punin (1888-1953)’, was published by Brill Academic Publishers in June 2012. At present Natalia is writing her second PhD thesis, at the Courtauld, on the development of proletarian art in Russia after the 1917 Revolution, and its various forms of expression in the street decorations of Petrograd.


 Mellie Naydenova-Slade

Mellie Naydenova-Slade received her BA from the University of Cambridge and her Masters and PhD from the Courtauld Institute, writing her thesis on the iconography of the Holy Kinship – the extended family of Christ. She has taught widely on the art and architecture of the Middle Ages at institutions including the Courtauld Institute, Birkbeck College, the University of Kent and the Sotheby’s Institute of Art. She is currently completing a book based on her doctoral thesis which has been supported by a post-doctoral fellowship from Yale’s Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art. Her publications have focused on English medieval art, spanning a period from the late Romanesque to the Reformation and reflecting a particular interest in wall paintings and manuscript illumination. This year at the Courtauld she is teaching a Graduate Diploma course entitled Patronage, Making and Meaning: the Gothic Image in England, 1200-1530.


Heather Norris Nicholson

Heather Norris Nicholson is The Andrew W Mellon Foundation Visiting Professor for 2013-14. She is Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Visual and Oral History Research, University of Huddersfield. Her current interdisciplinary research focuses on issues of visual memory, identity, belonging and historical change within amateur visual culture, as developed in Amateur Films. Meaning and Practice 1927-1977 (Manchester University Press, 2012). Her interests in how social access to recreational filmmaking gradually widened explores aspects of family life, everyday and working lives, local and regional identity, leisure time and overseas travel. Wider interests explore issues of archival access, changing patterns of personal record making and also the visual politics of cultural representation as seen in earlier film-related writings on indigenous filmmaking and changing filmic identities, include Screening Culture: Meaning and Identity (ed.) (Lexington, 2003). She is part of the Oral History Journal’s editorial group, is fervently committed to bringing amateur film to wider audiences and is currently co-writing a book on Britain’s pioneering twentieth century women amateur filmmakers.


Greg Salter

Greg Salter is Visiting Lecturer at the Courtauld Institute of Art on the MA course, Modernism in Britain, 1890-1970. Alongside this, he is currently Post-Doctoral Researcher at the Geffrye Museum, London, working on their Documenting Homes Collection. He completed a PhD at the University of East Anglia in 2013, titled ‘Domesticity and Masculinity in 1950s British Painting’.


Lisa Tickner

Lisa Tickner is an Honorary Professor at The Courtauld. Her current research interests include the London art world in the 1960s, British art c.1880-1980, and contemporary women artists.


Anne Vagner

Anne M. Wagner is an art historian, critic, and teacher who writes on a range of topics in 19th, 20th, and 21st century art, particularly sculpture. Among her recently published essays are studies of Anthony McCall’s 1970s drawings, Haegue Yang’s objects and installations, and the uncanny vitality of Rosemarie Trockel’s recent works.  Her writing has appeared in such journals as ArtforumRepresentations, October, and The Threepenny Review.

Her books include Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux:  Sculptor of the Second Empire, which was published in 1986; Three Artists (Three Women), which appeared in 1996; and Mother Stone: The Vitality of Modern British Sculpture, which came out in 2005. A House Divided: On Recent American Art appeared in 2012.

Anne M. Wagner is Class of 1936 Chair Emerita in the Department of History of Art at the University of California, Berkeley, and Visiting Distinguished Professor at the University of York. During Fall 2012, she was Mellon Residential Fellow in Arts Practice and Scholarship at the Richard and Mary L. Gray Center for the Arts and Inquiry at the University of Chicago. In 2010-11, she held the post of Henry Moore Foundation Research Curator at Tate Britain.  In summer 2012, the museum staged an exhibition, Lowry and the Painting of Modern Life, which she curated with T. J. Clark.  The book accompanying the show was included on the list of best art books of 2013 compiled by the Financial Times.


Giles Waterfield

Giles Waterfield is an independent curator and writer, Associate Scholar at The Courtauld Institute of Art and Director of Royal Collection Studies. He taught The Courtauld’s M.A. in the History and Theory of The Art Museum, and has worked as Head of Education at the Royal Pavilion, Art Gallery and Museums and as Director of Dulwich Picture Gallery from 1979 to 1996.  He was joint curator of the exhibition Art Treasures of England at the Royal Academy of Arts in 1998, In Celebration: The Art of the Country House at the Tate Gallery in 1998 and Below Stairs, National Portrait Galleries, London and Edinburgh, in 2003-4.  He is an authority on the history of museums and his publications include: Palaces of Art, Art for the People and Soane and Death, as well as three novels. He is a member of the Advisory Committee of the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, a Vice-President of NADFAS and Trustee of Charleston, Sussex.


Ursula Weekes

Ursula Weekes was formerly Supervisor of the Print Room at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. She gained her PhD in 2002 from the Courtauld Institute of Art (published as ‘Early Engravers and their Public’ by Brepols/Harvey Miller, 2004). From 2004 to 2010 she was based in Delhi as a Postdoctoral Commonwealth Fellow at the Indira Gandhi National Centre for Arts, and she also taught on Mughal and Renaissance art for the School of Arts and Aesthetics at Jawaharlal Nehru University. She is now in London, completing her book on ‘The Great Mughals and the Art of Europe’. Last year she taught a new BA Special Option course for the Courtauld on “Mughal Painting c.1550-1748”.


Iris Wien

Iris Wien is the Marie Curie Fellow of the Gerda Henkel Foundation. After studies in Architecture and Urban planning at the Technical University Stuttgart Iris studied Art history, Philosophy and Sociology in Bonn, Bochum and Berlin. She received her PhD from the Freie Universität Berlin with a dissertation entitled Joshua Reynolds: Mythos und Metapher (Munich: Wilhelm Fink Verlag, 2009). She was predoctoral fellow of the Studienstiftung des Deutschen Volkes. Her work was also supported by research grants from the Freie Universität Berlin and the DAAD Bonn. From 2006 to 2012 she held a position as Assistant Professor at the Art Historical Department of the Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universität Frankfurt. She has published on British Art of the eighteenth and nineteenth century as well as on contemporary art and photography. Methodological issues of interpretation as addressed in „Ein Pop-Künstler als Medusa? Begegnung mit zwei Selbstbildnissen von Andy Warhol“, in: Wiener Jahrbuch für Kunstgeschichte, Bd. 59 (2011) are a special interest of her research. While at the Courtauld she is working on her project “The Elements of Drawing: Reflections on the status of graphic marks in visual theory in 19th-century England”.


Rachel Worth

For the academic session 2013-14, Rachel Worth is contributing to Dr Rebecca Arnold’s course, ‘MADocumenting Fashion: Modernity, Film and Image in Europe and America, 1920-1945’. She is Professor of History of Dress and Fashion (since 2008) at the Arts University Bournemouth where she is also Assistant Director of Research. On completion of her BA (Hons) degree (History, Newnham College, University of Cambridge), PGCE (University of Bristol) and MA (History of Dress, Courtauld Institute of Art), she spent a short time in fashion retail, successfully completing the Marks & Spencer Graduate Management Training. She joined the Arts University Bournemouth in 1999 as course leader, BA (Hons) Fashion Studies, responsible for a new degree in the history, theory and practice of fashion. At the same time, she completed her PhD (2002, Courtauld Institute of Art). In 2008-9, Rachel was awarded a TQEF industry secondment at New Look Retailers towards research into sustainable and ethical retail practice. Rachel’s research interests include the history of dress and textiles from the eighteenth century to the present, with a particular emphasis on the history of working-class dress and the retailing of fashion. Recent publications interrogate a variety of visual and literary sources for exploration of how the study of clothing can inform our understanding of past and present societies, both from the point of view of how dress is produced and consumed, as well as from the perspective of how it is understood in relation to discourses of representation and for the elucidation of broader cultural contexts and motifs. Current research is concerned with the relationship between the history of dress and social class.


Catherine Yvard

Catherine Yvard completed a degree in sociology and political science in France before turning to art history at Trinity College, Dublin where she completed a PhD in 2005, focusing on a late 15th-century French book of hours (Dublin, Chester Beatty Library, ms. 89) and including a hitherto-unpublished Catalogue of Manuscript Books of Hours in Irish Public Libraries. She has worked on digitisation projects at the Chester Beatty Library in Dublin, the Bodleian Library in Oxford and the British Library in London, cataloguing medieval illuminated manuscripts. She currently teaches courses on illuminated manuscripts in the Middle Ages at Morley College, London, and has taught on this topic at Trinity College Dublin, University College Dublin and at the Courtauld Institute of Art (Summer School).

She specialises in the study of late-medieval Books of Hours and is particularly interested in the transition from manuscript to printed, and the transmission of patterns through time and space. She is now also turning her attention to ivories, as she has been seeing quite a few lately.

2012-13

 

Shir Aloni

Jocelyn Anderson

Charlotte Ashby

Thomas Balfe

Meredith A. Brown

Meredith A. Brown holds a BA in studio art and art history from Stanford University (2003) and an MA (2007) and PhD (2012) in art history from The Courtauld. Her doctoral research, supervised by Professor Mignon Nixon, explored the ways in which A.I.R. Gallery, the first women’s cooperative gallery in the United States, used feminist and other activist strategies to become the leading institutional space for women artists in the 1970s. Meredith has taught at The Courtauld, Stanford University, and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; lectured and published widely; and curated exhibitions of contemporary art at the Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Centre for Visual Arts at Stanford and Tiger Strikes Asteroid, a cooperative gallery in Philadelphia. Her research interests include the intersection of feminist politics and pedagogy, representations of labour and bureaucracy, and artistic collaboration in postwar art and art institutions. She was the 2013 Andrew W. Mellon Research Forum Postdoctoral Fellow (Activities Coordinator) at The Courtauld. Her project there examines various aspects of collaboration and collectivity and their influence on both the production of art and the writing of its histories.

Charlotte de Mille

Eleni Dimitriadou

Katherine Faulkner

Caroline Fowler

Christine Gardner

Stefania Gerevini

Pia Gottschaler

Kate Grandjouan

Chris Green

Sarah Guérin

Sarah Guérin received her PhD from the University of Toronto in July 2009 for a dissertation entitled ‘Tears of Compunction’: French Gothic Ivories in Devotional Practice. Prior to arriving at the Courtauld, she was a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University, and also held the Hanns Swarzenski and Brigitte Horney Swarzenski Fellowship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. An expert in medieval ivories and associated with the Gothic Ivories Project, Sarah’s publications have appeared in the Journal of Medieval History and West 86th. While at the Courtauld, in addition to teaching courses on medieval art, Sarah is working on a number of projects, including a book manuscript entitled Ivory Palaces: Gothic Sculptures at Church and Court and a catalogue for the Gulbenkian Museum, Lisbon.

Jack Hartnell

Melena Hope

Melena Hope completed her PhD, entitled ‘Painted Domestic Chapels and Oratories in the Households of Fifteenth-Century France,’ at The Courtauld Institute of Art in 2009, where she also undertook a two-year post-doctoral fellowship. She is a visiting lecturer at The Courtauld Institute of Art and Head of Art History at Morley College. While her specific interests centre around religious wall paintings in domestic and other ‘private’ settings, she is more broadly interested in the function and audience of devotional art, the relationship between artworks of different media (especially the interplay between works of art and their architectural settings), and artistic culture in Northern Europe in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. In 2012-13 she is teaching a course on Power, Piety and Prestige: Art at the Courts of France c. 1340-1420.

Susan Jones

Klara Kemp-Welch

Liz Kim

Cadence Kinsey

Sara Knelman

Ayla Lepine

Caroline Levitt

Vanja Malloy

In spring 2013, Vanja Malloy is teaching Beyond Black: Contemporary Art in Britain Now. She is currently completing a doctoral thesis with Gavin Parkinson titled: ‘Rethinking Alexander Calder: Astronomy, Modern Physics, Postmodernism and Play’.

Emily Mann

William Mcmanus

William McManus has done graduate studies in art history at Johns Hopkins and Princeton Universities. His dissertation at Princeton deals with the art and films of Andy Warhol (ca. 1961-68). His is the first full length study to take Warhol’s painting, media projects and films together as an organic whole, and to place Warhol’s project within a social and psychoanalytic context of the neoliberal aesthetics that emerged from this moment. Prior to arriving at the Courtauld, McManus taught lecture and seminar courses at Vassar College, Stanford University and the Rhode Island School of Design, both in the departments of art and of media studies and the humanities centres more generally. His current research, loosely titled ‘Inside Postmodernism’ focuses on performance and projected works of the 1970s as they elaborate new models of historical experience. McManus has most recently given public lectures on these subjects at the Freie Universität Berlin, and at The Courtauld. His writing has appeared in the Art Journal and the Brooklyn Rail; an essay on Warhol’s painting and commodity relations is forthcoming in the journal Amerikastudien.

Maria Mileeva

Alister Mill

Natalia Murray

Oliver Norris

Paula Nuttall

Janet Robson

Tim Satterthwaite

Katrin Seyler

Katrin Seyler received her PhD in History of Art from The University of Birmingham in July 2012. Her AHRC-funded doctoral research explored how early-modern journeymen image-makers acquired and organized knowledge. From this research, the concept of a “Republic of Tools” emerged as a framework for the analysis of non-scholarly traditions of thought which shaped the pan-European artisan community of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. As Andrew W. Mellon Research Forum Postdoctoral Fellow for 2013, Katrin is developing the idea of the “Republic of Tools” by investigating how it was affected by crises and trauma, such as war, revolution and internal conflicts. At The Courtauld, Katrin is also teaching a second-year course on the evaluation of texts composed by early-modern artists, and supports the Andrew W. Mellon-funded M.A. “Visualising Knowledge in the Early Modern Netherlands”.

Mellie Slade

Lisa Tickner

Rose Walker

Kuenga Wangmo

Ursula Weekes

Iris Wien

After studies in Architecture and Urban planning at the Technical University Stuttgart Iris Wien studied Art history, Philosophy and Sociology in Bonn, Bochum and Berlin. She received her PhD from the Freie Universität Berlin with a dissertation entitled Joshua Reynolds: Mythos und Metapher (Munich : Wilhelm Fink Verlag, 2009). She was predoctoral fellow of the Studienstiftung des Deutschen Volkes. Her work was also supported by research grants from the Freie Universität Berlin and the DAAD Bonn. From 2006 to 2012 she held a position as Assistant Professor at the Art Historical Department of the Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universität Frankfurt. She has published on British Art of the eighteenth and nineteenth century as well as on contemporary art. Her publications include „Transparenz der Unschuld. Ein Blick auf englische Kinderbildnisse des 18. Jahrhunderts“, in: Die Entdeckung der Kindheit: das englische Kinderporträt und seine europäische Nachfolge / exh. cat. Städel Museum, 20. Apr. – 15. July 2007, ed. by Mirjam Neumeister, Köln : Dumont, 2007, and “Naturalising tradition: why learning from the masters?”, in: Learning from the Masters: The teaching of Art History in Art Schools, from the eighteenth century to the present, ed. by Matthew Potter, Farnham : Ashgate (forthcoming). While at the Courtauld she is working on her project “The Elements of Drawing: Reflections on the status of graphic marks in visual theory in 19th-century England” and preparing a book publication about “Art Criticism in the light of the Exhibition Culture in 19th Century London”.

Rachel Worth

Catherine Yvard

2011-12

Monia Abdallah

Charlotte Ashby

Thomas Balfe

Tim Clark

Elizabeth Currie

Amy de la Hay

Charlotte de Mille

Amanda Delorey

Kate Grandjouan

Emily Gray

Chris Green

Sarah Guerin

Jim Harris

Sarah Hyde

Lucetta Johnson

Susan Jones

Klara Kemp-Welch

Ayla Lepine

Maria Mileeva

John Milner

Juliet Mitchell

Natialia Murray

Bronwyn Ormsby

Ed Payne

Janet Robson

Elisa Schaar

John-Paul Stonard

Glenn Sujo

Mika Takigushi

Lisa Tichner

Zahira Veliz

Rose Walker

Kuenga Wangmo

Giles Waterfield

Catherine Yvard

2010-11

Deborah Babbage

Thomas Balfe

Jessica Berenbeim

Federico Botano

Ben Burbridge

Amy de la Hay

Charlotte de Mille

Lucy Donkin

Anthony Gardner

Kate Grandjouan

Catherine Grant

Chris Green

Jim Harris

Melena Hope

Wendy Ikemoto

Carol Jacobi

Klara Kemp-Welch

Ayla Lepine

Caroline Levitt

Silvia Loreti

Francesco Lucchini

Charlotte Martin de Fonjaudran

Maria Mileeva

Alister Mill

John Milner

B. D. Nandadeva

Bronwyn Ormsby

Francesca Pique

Stephanie Porras

Clare Richardson

Kate Stonor

Glenn Sujo

Lisa Tickner

Sibylla Tringham

Charles Velson Horie

Giles Waterfield

Mika Takigushi

2009-10

Elizabeth Bartman

Elizabeth Bartman is a specialist in Greek and Roman art. While an Associate Scholar at the Courtauld she was working on two major projects: a study of ethnic identity in Roman portraiture and of the “ideal” sculpture – images of gods, mythic figures, personifications, etc. as opposed to historical personages – collected by Henry Blundell in the late eighteenth century for his estate at Ince outside Liverpool. The largest private collection ever assembled in Britain, Blundell’s statues present a cross-section of Roman decorative sculpture; heavily restored, they are as much a reflection of eighteenth-century art as of ancient. Working with this material has led her into new areas of research such as the Grand Tour, collecting, and the reception of the antique. She was elected First Vice-President of the Archaeological Institute of America in January 2007.


Jessica Berenbeim

Jessica Berenbeim was the 2009–11 Kress Fellow at the Courtauld Institute.  Her PhD thesis, for Harvard University, concerned the Sherborne Missal (produced c.1400) and the role of documentary literacy and legal consciousness in artistic representation.  Her research interests include the history of book production, reading, and literacy; the history and art of monasticism; medieval historiography and conceptions of the past; and the relationship of bureaucracy and institutional history to developments in the visual arts.  Publications include: ‘Script after Print: Juan de Yciar and the Art of Writing’ (forthcoming in Word & Image); ‘Milanese Chant in the Monastery?’ (co-authored; in Ambrosiana at Harvard, ed. by Thomas Forrest Kelly and Matthew Mugmon, 2009); and ‘An English Manuscript of the Somme le roi’ (in Cambridge Illuminations, ed. by Stella Panayotova, 2007).


 

Federico Botana

Federico Botana’s research focuses on the relationship between visual culture and social practices in the Late Middle Ages. While an Associate Scholar at the Courtauld, he was completing a book on the representation of the Corporal and Spiritual Works of Mercy in medieval Italy, and starting a research project on didactic uses of manuscript illustration in fourteenth- and fifteenth-century Tuscany. In 2009 he was the Research Forum Postdoctoral Fellow and the organiser of ‘Imaging Dogma, Picturing Belief.’ At this conference scholars from the UK, ten European countries, and the United States presented research on late-medieval mural cycles in parish churches and chapels across Europe.  Since 2008 Federico has worked at The Courtauld and Birkbeck College as a visiting lecturer on Italian late-medieval and renaissance art.  His publications include: ‘Virtuous and Sinful Uses of Temporal Wealth in the Breviari d’Amor of Matfre Ermengaud,’ Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes, LXVII (2004); ‘Like the Members of a Body: Assisting the Poor in Matfre Ermengaud’s Breviari d’Amor,’ in Armut und Armenfürsorge in der italienischen Stadkultur zwischen 13. und 16. Jarhunderts (Frankfurt, 2006).


 

Lucy Bradnock

Lucy Bradnock completed her PhD at the University of Essex on the reception of Antonin Artaud in American art during the period 1949-65. Her research focuses on various artists, including Wallace Berman, John Cage, Bruce Conner, Carolee Schneemann and Robert Rauschenberg.  Central to her work are issues of literary transmission, translation, and the problems of Surrealist legacy. Lucy Bradnock has presented her research at conferences at Tate Modern, The Courtauld Institute, and in CAA and AAH conferences. She published an article on Nancy Spero’s engagement with Artaud in Papers of Surrealism (issue 3, spring 2005); she is a founder-editor of rebus, the Essex postgraduate journal of art history and theory; a visiting lecturer at the Slade School of Fine Art; and was appointed coordinator of the Courtauld Research Forum Writing Art History seminar group.


 

Meredith Brown

Meredith Brown was a Visiting Lecturer at The Courtauld Institute of Art where she was also a PhD candidate. Her thesis, entitled A History of A.I.R. Gallery: Feminism and the Art Institution, focused on the institutional history of the first women’s cooperative gallery in the United States and its impact on the feminist art movement and on other alternative art spaces in 1970s and 1980s America. Her recently published articles include ‘Ms. Chicago and the California Girls’ and ‘Recipes’ in The Moon, a publication accompanying the event ‘Once More with Feeling’ at Tate Modern, 27 June 2009. In 2003 she co-curated an exhibition of Modern and contemporary art at the Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts at Stanford University and contributed to its catalogue. Her current research interests include the intersection of feminist politics and pedagogy, representations of labor and bureaucracy, and artistic collaboration.


 

Malcolm Bull


 

Zirwat Chowdhury

Zirwat Chowdhury is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Art History at Northwestern University. Her dissertation, Anglo-Indian Encounters: British Art and Architecture, 1780-1836 examines landscape paintings, antiquarian studies, caricatures, portraits and architecture. She is especially interested in how the British conceptualisation of Indian architecture emerged from visual encounters with India that hinged on both inter-mediality and the protean nature of British colonial expansion.


 

Robin Cormack

Robin Cormack is an eminent Byzantinist; he has been rewarded with the title of ‘Emeritus Professor’ after a long teaching career at The Courtauld Institute.  His publications include several major studies, notably his articles on the mosaics of St. Sophia at Thessaloniki (1981) and on the Icon of St. Peter at Chora (1983); and his monographs Writing in Gold: Byzantine Society and its Icons (1985), and Painting the soul: Icons, death masks and shrouds (1997). He has recently co-curated with Adrian Locke and Maria Vassilaki the exhibition Byzantium  at the Royal Academy of Arts.


 

Charlotte de Mille

Charlotte de Mille completed her doctoral thesis ‘Bergson in Britain c. 1890-1914’ in 2009. Research activities include an exploration of the possibilities and limitations of intuition as a method for Art History though the work of Henri Bergson and Virginia Woolf with the Research Forum’s Writing Art History group. With the Research Forum and the RMA, Charlotte was convenor of Music and Modernism, held in May 2009, from which she will be editing a volume of essays. With Public Programmes for The Courtauld Gallery, she co-ordinated a series of lecture-recitals that seek to draw together music and fine art, and has also commissioned new music in conjunction with The Courtauld’s East Wing VIII exhibition of contemporary visual art. Charlotte was Visiting Lecturer for the academic year 2009-2010.


 

Caroline Elam

Caroline Elam’s research interests include many areas of Italian renaissance art, architecture and urbanism, as well as the history of art history and criticism since the mid nineteenth century. She is currently completing a book on Roger Fry and Italian Art for Yale University Press, and writing a chapter on ‘Art in Lorenzo de’ Magnifico’s Florence’ for a volume on Renaissance Florence to be published by Cambridge University Press. She has recently co-curated and edited the catalogue of an exhibition on Michelangelo’s architectural drawings for the Centro Palladiano in Vicenza (closing 10 December 2006) which will move to the Casa Buonarroti, Florence, from 15 December to 19 March 2007. Her next project is a book to be called The Urban Face of Renaissance Florence.


 

Rebecca Farbstein

Rebecca Farbstein’s research bridges the fields of art history, archaeology, and anthropology to explore the way prehistoric artists made some of the world’s earliest art. This interdisciplinary research investigates fundamental questions about the origins of symbolism and the ways technological innovation, creativity and symbolism intersected in the production of some of the world’s most ancient art.  Her research develops a technological and material-based methodology that reconstructs the processes that transform a raw material from its found form into a piece of art. This methodology involves visual assessment of the objects, experimentation with the raw materials, and contextual analysis of other finds and raw materials found at study sites. She previously focused on Upper Palaeolithic art in Central Europe and completed her PhD at Cambridge in 2008.  Her previous publications related to this research include: ‘New finds of Upper Paleolithic decorative objects from Predmostí, Czech Republic,’ (with J. Svoboda) in Antiquity, 81(2007); ‘Rethinking constructions of the body in Pavlovian portable art: a material-based approach,’ in  Archaeological Review from Cambridge, 21(2006). She is currently co-editing a volume of papers about representation, image and technology. As Caroline Villers Research Fellow for 2009-10, she was studying approximately 400 objects curated at the British Museum. These figurines, excavated from sites in western Europe and dating to between 17-11,000 years before present, present the opportunity to study the convergence of technique and appearance in art found in different contexts and made in distinct raw materials including antler, bone, mammoth ivory and stone.


 

Sander L. Gilman

Sander L. Gilman is a distinguished professor of the Liberal Arts and Sciences as well as Professor of Psychiatry at Emory University, where he is the Director of the Program in Psychoanalysis and the Health Sciences Humanities Initiative. A cultural and literary historian, he is the author or editor of over eighty books. His Fat: A Cultural History of Obesity appeared in 2008; his most recent edited volume, Race and Contemporary Medicine:  Biological Facts and Fictions was published that same year. He is the author of the basic study of the visual stereotyping of the mentally ill, Seeing the Insane, published by John Wiley and Sons in 1982 (reprinted: 1996) as well as the standard study of Jewish Self-Hatred, the title of his Johns Hopkins University Press monograph of 1986. For twenty-five years he was a member of the humanities and medical faculties at Cornell University where he held the Goldwin Smith Professorship of Humane Studies.  For six years he held the Henry R. Luce Distinguished Service Professorship of the Liberal Arts in Human Biology at the University of Chicago and for four years was a distinguished professor of the Liberal Arts and Medicine and creator of the Humanities Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  During 1990-1991 he served as the Visiting Historical Scholar at the National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD; 1996-1997 as a fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA; 2000-2001 as a Berlin prize fellow at the American Academy in Berlin; 2004-5 as the Weidenfeld Visiting Professor of European Comparative Literature at Oxford University.  He has been a visiting professor at numerous universities in North America, South Africa, the United Kingdom, Germany, and New Zealand, and, in 2008-09 he was Visiting Professor at The Courtauld Institute teaching in collaboration with Shulamith Behr on the Research Forum / Andrew W Mellon Foundation MA Arts in Exile in Britain 1933-1945: Politics and Cultural Identity.  He was president of the Modern Language Association in 1995.  He has been awarded a Doctor of Laws (honoris causa) at the University of Toronto in 1997, elected an honorary professor of the Free University in Berlin (2000), and an honorary member of the American Psychoanalytic Association (2007).


 

Teresa Gleadowe

Teresa Gleadowe was the founding director of the MA programme Curating Contemporary Art at the Royal College of Art and directed the course from 1992 to 2006. During this period the department pioneered research into relationships between contemporary art and curatorial practice and developed a series of ambitious international art exhibitions selected and curated by students on the course. Teresa Gleadowe is now continuing her research into aspects of recent curatorial history and is Commissioning Editor for a new series of books, which will provide a historical study and critical appraisal of significant exhibitions of contemporary art in the period from the mid-twentieth century to the present.


 

Catherine Grant

Catherine Grant completed her PhD, entitled Different Girls: performances of adolescence in contemporary photographic portraits at The Courtauld Institute in 2006. Her research interests include the representation of adolescence and femininity in photography, the theorisation of spectatorship and identification in relation to the photographic portrait, and the intersection between queer theory and feminism. Her current research builds on her PhD, which is being prepared for publication in various formats. She was the 2007 Research Forum Fellow at The Courtauld Institute of Art and was the coordinator for the Research Forum’s Writing Art History seminar group, as well as being a Teaching Fellow at the Slade School of Art and a Visiting Lecturer at The Courtauld.


 

Jim Harris

Jim Harris is a Visiting Lecturer at The Courtauld and is completing a PhD on the treated surfaces of fifteenth century sculpture, with particular regard to the painted and gilded sculpture of Donatello.  His research interests also touch more broadly on sculptural techniques and on the relationship between theology and representation.  He is a member of the Sculptural Processes research group and edited immediations The Courtauld Postgraduate Research Journal, for two years.  Jim has published on André Beauneveu, Northern polychromed sculpture, Florentine painting and contemporary drawing and was involved with the Public Programmes department at The Courtauld.  He was also a Director of the contemporary gallery Man and Eve, where he curated In Place: new collage works by Sarah Bridgland.


 

Melena Hope

Melena Hope completed her PhD, entitled ‘Painted Domestic Chapels and Oratories in the Households of Fifteenth-Century France,’ at The Courtauld Institute of Art in January 2009.  Since 2008 she was the Bob McCarthy Post-Doctoral Fellow, working in collaboration with the Conway Library at The Courtauld.  Part of the fellowship was devoted to a research and digitisation project aiming to catalogue and make available over 4,000 images of wall paintings.  In addition to her work on this image collection, she undertook two personal research projects which investigate examples of fifteenth-century mural decoration in French chapels.  While her specific interests centre around religious wall paintings in domestic and other ‘private’ settings, she is more broadly interested in the function and audience of devotional art, the relationship between artworks of different media (especially the interplay between works of art and their architectural settings), and artistic culture in Northern Europe in the late fourteenth and fifteenth centuries.  She was a visiting lecturer at The Courtauld (since 2007) and the University of Kent, and has taught at Birkbeck College.


 

Wendy Ikemoto

Wendy Ikemoto was the 2009-2011 Terra Foundation for American Art Postdoctoral Fellow at The Courtauld Institute of Art.  She completed her PhD in the History of Art and Architecture at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 2009.  Her dissertation examined paired, or pendant, painting in the antebellum United States.  Ikemoto is working on the book manuscript of her dissertation and developing a study of American art in the Pacific world in the 19th and early-20th centuries.  Her article, ‘Putting the “Rip” in “Rip Van Winkle”: Historical Absence in John Quidor’s Pendant Paintings,’ was published in the summer 2009 issue of American Art.


 

Lucetta Johnson


 

Philippa Kaina

Philippa Kaina is a Visiting Lecturer at The Courtauld Institute of Art and the Department of History of Art and Architecture at the University of Reading. She recently completed her PhD, ‘Between History and Modernity: Negotiating subjectivity in the early work of Edgar Degas, c. 1854-1870,’ at University College London. As well as developing this project for publication in various formats she is also investigating the deployment of seriality and repetition as a key pictorial strategies in Degas’ oeuvre and the connections between the artist’s ‘early’ and ‘late’ work, particularly in relation to his imagery of the female body. Her wider research interests intersect with the broader historical milieu of nineteenth-century French art and visual culture. Key concerns here include: the demise of the academic ideal and its implications for the genre of the nude, the ‘de-militarization’ of the male body together with its implications for masculine subjectivity, and the reception and cultural interpretation of Near and Middle Eastern antiquities in western colonial contexts.


Klara Kemp-Welch

Klara Kemp-Welch is the Leverhulme Early Career Fellow at The Courtauld for 2009-12. She is researching artistic exchange between the countries of the former Soviet ‘bloc’ and former Yugoslavia by initiating a project titled Festivals and Friendships: Networking the ‘bloc.’ The aim of this three year project is to collect and to compare artists’ stories and memories of the years 1956-1991, and to establish how ideas and information were conveyed across borders in the late socialist period. Klara is currently also completing the manuscript of a book titled Not Playing Politics: Anti-Heroism in Central European Art 1965-1989. She has published reviews, articles in journals, and catalogue essays on political aspects of modern and contemporary art. These include studies of work by Tadeusz Kantor, Jerzy Beres, Endre Tót, and Sanja Ivekovic.


 

Caroline Levitt

Caroline Levitt specialises in French art and literature of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; she completed her PhD on the relationship between Guillaume Apollinaire and André Breton as manifested through their involvement and interest in artistic practices such as graffiti, illustration, cinema and the collection and construction of objects. Her article ‘Screening poetry: Guillaume Apollinaire, André Breton and experimental cinema’ appeared in the 2008 issue of Immediations. Over the next year, Caroline plans to develop interests emerging from her doctoral research, in particular her work on Le Corbusier, which she hopes will form the basis of a book. Other research interests include collaborations between artists, writers and craftsmen and the relationships between literature and sculpture. Caroline is a visiting lecturer at The Courtauld Institute of Art.


Ayla Lepine

A Visiting Lecturer at The Courtauld this year, Ayla Lepine is completing a PhD with Caroline Arscott. Titled ‘Sacred Beauty: George Frederick Bodley’s Designs for Oxford and Cambridge, 1858-1907’, her thesis research investigates points of intersection between the Gothic Revival and Victorian theology. She has lectured widely and currently teaches courses on nineteenth-century architecture and on gender and subjectivity in Victorian painting. In collaboration with Laura Cleaver, she is co-convenor of the Research Forum conference, ‘Gothic and its Legacies’, held in December 2009. Her forthcoming publications explore music and architecture in Victorian Cambridge, and sculpture and the gothic impulse at Washington National Cathedral. She works with Public Programmes at The Courtauld Gallery and is a historic buildings researcher for Donald Insall Associates. Ayla is the curator of Threads of Heaven: Ten Centuries of English Ecclesiastical Textiles, a major exhibition which will take place at St Paul’s Cathedral in autumn 2011.


 

Francesco Lucchini

Francesco Lucchini was the 2010 Research Forum postodoctoral Fellow. He completed his PhD, entitled ‘Objects at Work: a Material and Cultural History of the Reliquaries of St Anthony of Padua in the Basilica del Santo, ca.1231-1448 at The Courtauld in 2009. His interests cover a wide spectrum of medieval artifacts and techniques, including metalwork and material aspects of early Italian painting. Under the aegis of the Research Forum, he is currently organizing a research project on the Material Life of Things which aims to explore the production, manipulation, exchange and consumption of artefacts throughout their life histories. He is also co-organizing an inter-institutional research projects seeking to define the category of the Clever Object as a tool of art-historical interpretation. Forthcoming publications include: ‘Face, Counterface, Counterfeit. The Lost Silver Visage of the Reliquary of St. Anthony’s Jawbone,’ in Meaning in Motion: Semantics of Movement in Medieval Art and Architecture, ed. G. Freni and N. Zchomelidse (Princeton University Press, Forthcoming, 2010); ‘The Making of a Legend. The Reliquary of the Tongue and the Representation of St Anthony of Padua as a Preacher,’ in Franciscan Preaching, ed. T. J. Johnson (Brill, Forthcoming, 2010); ‘Circolazione di reliquie e committenza di reliquiari al Santo nel primo Quattrocento,’ in Cultura arte e committenza al Santo nel Quattrocento, eds. G. Baldissin Molli and L. Bertazzo (Padua, Forthcoming, 2010).


 

Mark McDonald

Mark McDonald is Curator of Old Master prints and Spanish drawings at the British Museum. His research interest include sixteenth and seventeenth century Spanish art, and European printmaking during the Renaissance. His recent publication The Print Collection of Ferdinand Columbus 1488-1539: a Renaissance collector in Seville was awarded the Mitchell Prize for Art History, the Eleanor Tufts Award for Hispanic studies in 2006, and named the Book of the Year by Apollo in 2004. His current and future research interests include Italian Chiaroscuro prints, the print collection of Cassiano dal Pozzo, Goya and Spanish drawings.


 

Alexandra Moschovi

Dr Alexandra Moschovi’s research has concentrated on the institutionalisation of photography in the 1980s and 1990s, exploring how its belated accommodation in the modern/contemporary art museum ushered in an ontological reassessment not only of its properties as a fine art practice, but also of the museum’s foundational values. Her research interests also include British and American cultural policies and issues relating to contemporary politics of representation. Recent curatorial projects have focused on the fusion of the private into the public and the changing morpheme of the post-industrial landscape in contemporary photographic practice. She is currently working on the recontextualisation of nineteenth-century photographs in various institutions, examining their collecting and taxonomic biography and how their use and exhibition value has changed.


 

Austin Nevin

Austin Nevin is involved in the Andrew W. Mellon funded “Master of the Fogg Pieta – Maestro di Figline Project” – a project which aims to create a research-based website, integrating art historical and technical information about a group of related but dispersed works by the Master of the Fogg Pietà, a major but little-studied artist, active in Florence and Assisi, c.1310– c.1330 (also known as the  Maestro di  Figline). Two of the panels from this putative ensemble belong to The Courtauld Institute, London, the Harvard University Art Museums and in other European and American museums. The pilot project will bring together “virtually” the various pieces that have been associated with a single ensemble by the Master of the Fogg Pietà, together with detailed information concerning their conservation, physical characteristics and history.  This will provide the basis for further research and study of the probable components of this altarpiece, and has the potential to expand from this nucleus to a consideration of the wider oeuvre of the Master, an artist of considerable technical interest, who worked in fresco and as a stained glass designer as well as on panel.


Divia Patel

Divia Patel is a curator in the Asian Department of the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Her areas of expertise include 19th century photography of India, contemporary Indian art and popular culture. She has recently co-curated an exhibition of paintings by western artists in India from the 17th -20th centuries, which will be touring in India during 2009. She curated the award wining, internationally touring exhibition, Cinema India: The Art of Bollywood and the photography section of the V&A exhibition, Arts of the Sikh Kingdoms (1999).  Her current projects include a display of photographs of Buddhist sites across Asia for April 2009, and research on contemporary design in India. Her publications include Cinema India: The Visual Culture of the Hindi Film, Reaktion Press, 2002, and articles on photography, contemporary art and the paintings of Ajanta.


Edward Payne

Edward Payne is a Visiting Lecturer at The Courtauld Institute of Art. He is currently completing his PhD thesis entitled ‘Violence and Corporality in the Art of Jusepe de Ribera’, which examines the problematic relationship between the imagery of suffering and the social history of violence in seventeenth-century Naples and Rome. In 2009 Edward held a three-month Rome Award at the British School at Rome, which enabled him to pursue research in the criminal archives at the Archivio di Stato di Roma. In 2008 he co-convened with Scott Nethersole a symposium entitled ‘Histories of Violence: Italy and the Mediterranean c.1300–1700,’ and this year he is co-convening with Hannah Williams the Inaugural Early Modern Symposium, ‘Everyday Objects: Art and Experience in Early Modern Europe’. Additionally, from 2007–08 Edward worked as a Print Room Assistant in The Courtauld Gallery Prints and Drawings Room, and his article ‘Dealing with Art: Pier Francesco Mola’s Caricature of Three Ecclesiastics’, which investigates a drawing from the collection, will be published in the 2009 issue of immediations. His current research interests include seventeenth-century Italian (especially Neapolitan) and Spanish painting, prints and drawings – particularly the work of Caravaggio, Ribera, Rosa and Zurbarán – and the reception of the Spanish School in nineteenth-century Britain and France.


Kathryn Rudy

Kathryn Rudy (Kate) specializes in late medieval manuscripts of the Low Countries. She has written articles about the manuscript precedents of Bruegel’s Netherlandish Proverbs; the earliest visual interpretation of the Ghent Altarpiece; illustrated manuscripts for instructing children; words as devotional objects; as well as several articles about medieval pilgrimage both real and imagined, culminating in a book (forthcoming) titled Nuns’ and Religious Women’s Virtual Pilgrimages in the Late Middle Ages. Other recent work includes an investigation of the manuscripts produced at the Franciscan Convent of St. Ursula in Delft. Her three long-term projects concentrate on the reception and original function of manuscripts: she has built a database to reconstruct fifteenth-century manuscripts whose prints have been cut out of them. She has compiled several thousand Middle Dutch rubrics that provide instructions for votaries in front of images for a book provisionally titled The Spiritual Economy of Images: The Performance of Prayer on the Eve of the Reformation in the Low Countries . Thirdly, she has nearly completed a book called The Prayerbook as Talisman in Late Medieval Flanders. At The Courtauld she will quantify grime and patterns of use in medieval manuscripts with the aid of a densitometer in a project called “Dirty Books.” She earned her Ph.D. from Columbia University in Art History, and also holds a Licentiate in Mediaeval Studies from the University of Toronto. She has held research, teaching, and curatorial positions in the US, UK, Canada, the Netherlands and Belgium.


Stephanie Schwartz

Stephanie Schwartz recently completed a two-year term as the Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in History and Theory of Photography at Bryn Mawr College. She received her doctoral degree from the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University in 2007. Her dissertation, The Crime of Cuba: Urbanism, Photography, and the Geopolitics of Americanization, developed an interdisciplinary framework for examining the relationship between modern aesthetic practices and the politics of decolonization. In addition to writing Cuba Per Diem: Walker Evans and American Photographs, a book-length study of Evans’s 1933 Cuba portfolio, Stephanie is developing a new project on contemporary Cuban photography.


Evgeny Steiner

Evgeny Steiner is a specialist in traditional Japanese art and in the 19th-20th centuries Russian art. His books include Stories for Little Comrades: Revolutionary Artists and the Making of Early Soviet Children’s Books (Univ. of Washington Press, 1999; Russian enlarged edition, 2002); Zen-Life: Ikkyu and Beyond (St.Petersburg, 2006; English edition is under preparation); Catalog of Japanese Prints in the Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts, 2 volumes (Moscow, 2008 – edited, translated Japanese poetry and wrote about 650 entries); Victory Over the Sun (London, 2008 – translated trans-rational Russian Futurist texts with commentaries and introduction). Prof. Steiner is Senior Research Associate at the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts (based at School of Oriental & African Studies, London) and Principal Research Fellow of the Russian Institute for Cultural Research (Moscow). His current project deals with European uncatalogued repositories of art displaced as a result of WWII. To enable him to work on this project, Prof. Steiner was named International & Area Studies Fellow ’08-09 by the American Council of Learned Societies and Wingate Scholar by the Wingate Foundation.


 

Mika Takiguchi

Mika Takiguchi is associate professor at Meiji University in Tokyo. She completed her PhD, entitled ‘Illuminated Gospel Books and the Perception of the Role of Images in Byzantium,’ at the Courtauld Institute in 2003. Several articles based on her doctoral research have been published or are being prepared for publication in various formats, mainly in Japanese.  Mika’s research is currently developing in three inter-connected areas. The first is the subject of her PhD, illuminated manuscripts.  Through her doctoral research, she investigated Byzantine Gospel manuscripts in the British Library, and expansion of this study into illuminated manuscripts in lands surrounding Byzantium is planned for coming years. The second area stemmed from her involvement in archaeological excavations in Turkey. She is currently completing a chapter on capitals for a book entitled Research of Early Byzantine Sites in Lycia, Turkey, to be published by Osaka University Press, in which she explores the questions of quarries, ateliers, mass production and transportation, design and iconography of capitals. The last area developed from her interest in the floor mosaics in Byzantine churches, which she investigated in excavation sites in Lycia.  Working with this material has led Mika into new areas of research, such as floor mosaics in Italy or in the Middle East and their association with Byzantium.


Zahira Véliz

Zahira Véliz has published frequently on the subject of Spanish drawings, especially the work of Alonso Cano. She has organised exhibitions at the Museo del Prado, Madrid and at the Museo de Bellas Artes de Asturias, Oviedo, Spain. In 2006 she organised a Wallace Collection exhibition focusing on Lady with a Fan by Velázquez, together with the variant from Chatsworth. Trained originally as an art conservator, she has contributed many articles to the literature of technical art history, and in 1986 she published Artists’ Treatises in Golden Age Spain (Cambridge University Press).  She has written numerous articles and lectured widely on Spanish art in the early modern era, and, as a member of the Centro de Estudios de Europa Hispánica (Madrid) is currently cataloguing the Spanish drawings in the collection of The Courtauld Institute, and working on the reconstruction of William Stirling-Maxwell’s drawings collection.


Laura Veneskey

Laura Veneskey is a PhD candidate at Northwestern University.  Her research investigates the circulation of sacred sites through portable artifacts between Late Antiquity and the Middle Byzantine period.  It is particularly concerned with the varying methods through which sacred place was evoked, recreated, and reused in disparate contexts, engendering sanctity in new locations and forging networks of power throughout the medieval Mediterranean.  She is also presently working on a translation and commentary of a portion of the Patriarch Nikephoros’ Refutatio et eversio.


Rose Walker

Rose Walker is a specialist in medieval Spanish art. She is currently working on a project that focuses on the interaction between culture and landscape. The British Academy is funding four field trips that constitute the first phase of this project. Each trip takes one of the principal Roman roads that crossed the Iberian peninsula and seeks alternative narratives to ‘the pilgrimage route’ and ‘the re-conquest’.  These narratives are revealed through diversions, detours and changes of direction that together demonstrate a new sense of belonging amongst the people who settled and built on new and old sites. A photographic record of the routes and of the art and architecture that defined them is an important part of the project.


Giles Waterfield

Giles Waterfield is an independent curator and writer, Associate Scholar at The Courtauld Institute of Art and Director of Royal Collection Studies. He taught The Courtauld’s M.A. in the History and Theory of The Art Museum, and has worked as Head of Education at the Royal Pavilion, Art Gallery and Museums and as Director of Dulwich Picture Gallery from 1979 to 1996.  He was joint curator of the exhibition Art Treasures of England at the Royal Academy of Arts in 1998, In Celebration: The Art of the Country House at the Tate Gallery in 1998 and Below Stairs, National Portrait Galleries, London and Edinburgh, in 2003-4.  He is an authority on the history of museums and his publications include: Palaces of Art, Art for the People and Soane and Death, as well as three novels. He is a member of the Advisory Committee of the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, a Vice-President of NADFAS and Trustee of Charleston, Sussex.


Hannah Williams

Hannah Williams is a Visiting Lecturer at the Courtauld Institute of Art. A specialist in French art of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, Hannah is currently completing her PhD thesis entitled Portrait of the Artist: An Ethnography of the Paris Académie Royale c.1648-1793, which examines the cultural value of portraits and self-portraits within this institutional community. In 2008-9, Hannah was awarded a twelve-month fellowship in Paris as The Courtauld Pre-Doctoral Fellow at the Centre Allemand de l’Histoire de l’Art, where she undertook archival research on the history of the Académie Royale and its collections. She has published her research in The Courtauld postgraduate research journal, immediations (2007), and has articles forthcoming in the French online journal of the INHA and the EHESS, Images Re-vues (October 2009), and in a book edited by Markus Castor et al (eds.), Re-Invention: Zur Etablierung der Druckgraphik als künstlerisches Medium (Berlin: Deutscher Kunstverlag, 2009). Hannah has presented papers at several conferences in the UK, France and Australia: in 2007, she co-convened with Alister Mill the AAH New Voices Symposium, ‘Art and Memory’ (Courtauld); in 2008, she co-convened with Mary Roberts a session on ‘Self-Portraiture and Representations of the Artist’ at the AAH Annual Conference (Tate Britain); and this year she is co-convening with Edward Payne the Inaugural Early Modern Symposium at The Courtauld, ‘Everyday Objects: Art and Experience in Early Modern Europe.’


Catherine Yvard

Catherine Yvard is currently working as Project Officer on the Gothic Ivories Project, at the Courtauld (2008-2011). She has previously worked on medieval illuminated manuscripts digitisation projects at the British Library in London, the Bodleian Library in Oxford and the Chester Beatty Library in Dublin. She teaches a Summer School at the Courtauld Institute focusing on illuminated manuscripts in the Middle Ages and has taught several courses related to this topic at Trinity College, Dublin and University College, Dublin. Her publications include ‘The Glenstal Prayer Book’, in Art and Devotion in Medieval Ireland, (Dublin, 2006), pp. 98-120, and ‘Un livre d’heures inédit à la Chester Beatty Library de Dublin’, in Art de l’enluminure, 19 (Dec. 2006-Feb. 2007), pp. 2-65. She specialises in the study of late-medieval Books of Hours and is particularly interested in the transition from manuscript to printed, and the transmission of patterns through time and space. She is now also turning her attention to ivories, as she will be working closely with them over the next few years

2008-09

Elizabeth Bartman

Elizabeth Bartman is a specialist in Greek and Roman art. In 2008-09, she was working on two major projects: a study of ethnic identity in Roman portraiture and of the “ideal” sculpture – images of gods, mythic figures, personifications, etc. as opposed to historical personages – collected by Henry Blundell in the late eighteenth century for his estate at Ince outside Liverpool. The largest private collection ever assembled in Britain, Blundell’s statues present a cross-section of Roman decorative sculpture; heavily restored, they are as much a reflection of eighteenth-century art as of ancient. Working with this material has led her into new areas of research such as the Grand Tour, collecting, and the reception of the antique. She was elected First Vice-President of the Archaeological Institute of America in January 2007.


Judith Batalion

Judith Batalion was the 2008 Research Forum Fellow. She completed her PhD, entitled ‘Mad Mothers, Fast Friends, and Twisted Sisters: Women’s Collaborations in the Visual Arts (1970-2000)’ in 2007. Judith’s research interests include creative collaboration, representations of domesticity, feminist performance art, the history of friendship, humour, and the relationships between science and art.  During her fellowship, she edited a collection of writing about comedy audiences.


James Boaden

James Boaden’s PhD research engaged with questions of nostalgia and the pastoral genre in collage, assembled sculpture and experimental film in 1950s America. James has published articles on the subject in the Courtauld Institute’s research journal immediations as well as the on-line journal of the AHRC Centre for Surrealism and its Legacies: Papers of Surrealism. James has also conducted freelance curatorial work for the exhibition ‘Starting at Zero: Black Mountain College 1933-1957’ (Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge, 2005) and for the screenings entitled ‘Lights Up: American Structural Film’ at the National Film Theatre, London in 2006.


Federico Botana

Federico Botana is the 2009 Research Forum Fellow.  His research focuses on the relationship between visual culture and social practices in the Late Middle Ages. Hewas completing a book on the representation of the Corporal and Spiritual Works of Mercy in medieval Italy.  His previous publications included: ‘Virtuous and Sinful Uses of Temporal Wealth in the Breviari d’Amor of Matfre Ermengaud,’ Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes, LXVII (2004); ‘Like the Members of a Body: Assisting the Poor in Matfre Ermengaud’s Breviari d’Amor,’ in Armut und Armenfürsorge in der italienischen Stadkultur zwischen 13. und 16. Jarhunderts, edited by Philine Helas and Gerhard Wolf (Frankfurt, 2006).


Lucy Bradnock

In 2008-09, Lucy Bradnock was completing her PhD at the University of Essex on the reception of Antonin Artaud in American art during the period 1949-65. Her research focuses on various artists, including Wallace Berman, John Cage, Bruce Conner, Carolee Schneemann and Robert Rauschenberg.  Central to her work are issues of literary transmission, translation, and the problems of Surrealist legacy. Lucy Bradnock has presented her research at conferences at Tate Modern, The Courtauld Institute, and in CAA and AAH conferences. She published an article on Nancy Spero’s engagement with Artaud inPapers of Surrealism (issue 3, spring 2005); she is a founder-editor of rebus, the Essex postgraduate journal of art history and theory; a visiting lecturer at the Slade School of Fine Art; and has been recently appointed coordinator of the Research Forum Writing Art History seminar group.


Benedict Burbridge

Benedict Burbridge is a writer and curator with a particular interest in contemporary art and the history of photography. He is currently undertaking doctoral research at the Courtauld Institute, focusing on the influence of nineteenth-century scientific and pseudo-scientific photography upon contemporary photographic art. A Visiting Lecturer at the Courtauld, Benedict has also worked as a Researcher with the visual arts organization Photoworks, commissioning new photography, managing and curating exhibitions, producing publications and a bi-annual magazine. Recent exhibitions include We Are Witnessing the Dawn of an Unknown Science at the Permanent Gallery in Brighton; No Passaran! at Charleston Farmhouse in Firle; and Mass Observation at the Centro Cultural Conde Duque, Madrid, as part of PhotoEspana 2005. He has written regularly for Photoworks magazine and has contributed essays to publications including Henna Nadeem: A Picture Book of Britain(Photoworks, 2006) and Pavillion Commissions 2007 (Pavilion, 2007).


Robin Cormack

Robin Cormack is an eminent Byzantinist and has been rewarded with the title of ‘Emeritus Professor’ after a long teaching career at the Courtauld Institute.  His publications include several major studies, notably his articles on the mosaics of St. Sophia at Thessaloniki (1981) and on the Icon of St. Peter at Chora (1983); and his monographs Writing in Gold: Byzantine Society and its Icons (1985), and Painting the soul: Icons, death masks and shrouds (1997). He has recently co-curated with Adrian Locke and Maria Vassilaki the exhibition Byzantium at the Royal Academy of Arts.


Charlotte de Mille

In 2008-09, Charlotte de Mille’s research developped in three inter-connected areas. First was the subject of her PhD, which was near completion. This doctoral work investigated the impact of French philosopher Henri Bergson on British Modernism c. 1890 – 1914, and expansion of this study into the 1920s was planned for the coming year. Second was her involvement with the Research Forum’s “Writing Art History” group, for which she explored the possibilities and limitations of intuition as a method for Art History though the work of Henri Bergson and Virginia Woolf. Lastly, was an interest in the relation between the disciplines of music and the fine arts in the Modern period, on which she organised a conference entitled “Music and Modernism” taking place in May 2009 with the help of the Research Forum. In 2008-09, Charlotte was a Visiting Lecturer at the Courtauld Institute.


Peter Dent

Peter Dent was a British Academy Post-Doctoral Research Fellow.  He worked on a project entitled ‘Sculpture and the Senses in Late Medieval Italy’. This concentrated on the strategies that Italian sculptors employed in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries in order to communicate a sense of ‘presence’. Beyond the immediate historical contexts for this enquiry, he also explored how developments during this period related to the long running theoretical debate about the nature of sculpture, in particular its ability to stimulate the sense of touch, in contrast to painting, which is primarily concerned with sight. This interest grew out of research conducted for his PhD, The Body of Christ in Fourteenth-Century Tuscan Sculpture, undertaken at the Courtauld Institute of Art and completed in 2005. More generally, he is interested in the relationships between sculpture and painting.


Caroline Elam

Caroline Elam’s research interests include many areas of Italian renaissance art, architecture and urbanism, as well as the history of  art history and criticism since the mid nineteenth century. In 2008-09, she was completing a book on Roger Fry and Italian Art for Yale University Press, and writing a chapter on ‘Art in Lorenzo de’ Magnifico’s Florence’ for a volume on Renaissance Florence to be published by Cambridge University Press. She co-curated and edited the catalogue of an exhibition on Michelangelo’s architectural drawings for the Centro Palladiano in Vicenza (closing 10 December 2006) which moved to the Casa Buonarroti, Florence, from 15 December to 19 March 2007. Her next project was a book to be called The Urban Face of Renaissance Florence.


 

Sander L. Gilman

Sander L. Gilman is a distinguished professor of the Liberal Arts and Sciences as well as Professor of Psychiatry at Emory University, where he is the Director of the Program in Psychoanalysis and the Health Sciences Humanities Initiative. A cultural and literary historian, he is the author or editor of over eighty books. His Fat: A Cultural History of Obesityappeared in 2008; his most recent edited volume, Race and Contemporary Medicine:  Biological Facts and Fictions was published that same year. He is the author of the basic study of the visual stereotyping of the mentally ill, Seeing the Insane, published by John Wiley and Sons in 1982 (reprinted: 1996) as well as the standard study of Jewish Self-Hatred, the title of his Johns Hopkins University Press monograph of 1986. For twenty-five years he was a member of the humanities and medical faculties at Cornell University where he held the Goldwin Smith Professorship of Humane Studies.  For six years he held the Henry R. Luce Distinguished Service Professorship of the Liberal Arts in Human Biology at the University of Chicago and for four years was a distinguished professor of the Liberal Arts and Medicine and creator of the Humanities Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  During 1990-1991 he served as the Visiting Historical Scholar at the National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD; 1996-1997 as a fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA; 2000-2001 as a Berlin prize fellow at the American Academy in Berlin; 2004-5 as the Weidenfeld Visiting Professor of European Comparative Literature at Oxford University.  He has been a visiting professor at numerous universities in North America, South Africa, the United Kingdom, Germany, and New Zealand, and, in 2008-09 he was Visiting Professor at the Courtauld Institute teaching in collaboration with Shulamith Behr on the Research Forum / Andrew W Mellon Foundation MA Arts in Exile in Britain 1933-1945: Politics and Cultural Identity.  He was president of the Modern Language Association in 1995.  He has been awarded a Doctor of Laws (honoris causa) at the University of Toronto in 1997, elected an honorary professor of the Free University in Berlin (2000), and an honorary member of the American Psychoanalytic Association (2007).


Teresa Gleadowe

Teresa Gleadowe was the founding director of the MA programme Curating Contemporary Art at the Royal College of Art and directed the course from 1992 to 2006. During this period the department pioneered research into relationships between contemporary art and curatorial practice and developed a series of ambitious international art exhibitions selected and curated by students on the course. In 2008-09, Teresa Gleadowe was continuing her research into aspects of recent curatorial history and was Commissioning Editor for a new series of books, which will provide a historical study and critical appraisal of significant exhibitions of contemporary art in the period from the mid-twentieth century to the present.


Linda Goddard

Linda Goddard was a British Academy Postdoctoral Research Fellow. Her research focuses on the relationship between painting and literature, as well as art criticism and artists’ writings in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century France. She completed her PhD, Aesthetic Hierarchies: interchange and rivalry between the visual arts and literature in France, c.1890-c.1920 at the Courtauld in 2004, and has since taught at the Courtauld and the University of Cambridge. During her fellowship, she was researching the writings of Paul Gauguin in the context of interdisciplinary tension and interaction in fin-de-siècle France. She has published two articles, ‘Birds of a Feather? Gauguin’s ambivalent relationship with literary symbolism’, immediations: the research journal of the Courtauld Institute of Art, 2005 and ‘Mallarmé, Picasso and the aesthetic of the newspaper’, Word & Image, October-December 2006, and co-edited the exhibition catalogue Literary Circles: artist, author, word and image in Britain, 1800-1920, Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, 2006.


Catherine Grant

Catherine Grant completed her PhD, entitled Different Girls: performances of adolescence in contemporary photographic portraits at the Courtauld Institute in 2006. Her research interests include the representation of adolescence and femininity in photography, the theorisation of spectatorship and identification in relation to the photographic portrait, and the intersection between queer theory and feminism. Her research built on her PhD, which was being prepared for publication in various formats. She was the 2007 Research Forum Fellow at the Courtauld Institute of Art and in 2008-09 she was the coordinator for the Research Forum’s Writing Art History seminar group, as well as being a Teaching Fellow at the Slade School of Art and a Visiting Lecturer at the Courtauld.


Melena Hope

In 2008-09, Melena Hope was the Bob McCarthy Post-Doctoral Fellow working in collaboration with the Conway Library at the Courtauld Institute of Art.  In 2008, she submitted her doctoral thesis entitled ‘Painted Domestic Chapels and Oratories in the Households of Fifteenth-Century France’.  While her specific interests centre around religious wall paintings in domestic and other ‘private’ settings, she is more broadly interested in the function and audience of devotional art, the relationship between artworks of different media (especially the interplay between works of art and their architectural settings), and artistic culture in Northern Europe in the late fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. In addition to her own research, she was also a visiting Lecturer at the Courtauld Institute of Art.


Maria Kokkori

As a Caroline Villers postdoctoral Fellow, her aim was to study Alexander Rodchenko’s paintings from the perspective of technical art history. Alexander Rodchenko was one of the most vivid artists of the Russian avant-garde, and, especially, of the constructivism movement. His work encompasses a remarkable diversity of mediums and fields of endeavour: painting, sculpture, drawing, collage, graphics, photomontage, designs for utilitarian objects and photography. This project built on her doctoral work focusing on the analysis of the Rodchenko’s techniques and materials, in relation to the aesthetic and compositional results, together with consideration of the history and the critical perception of Rodchenko’s paintings, and the place of the examined paintings in the evolution of his work. The making of the pictures, the attitudes to materials, brushworks and colours of the works were investigated. Practices, themes, and attitudes were explored within the broader context of the Russian avant-garde. Kokkori’s study focused on the examination of Rodchenko’s paintings from the Costakis collection and the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The technical examination of the materials and painting techniques used by the painter, intergraded with an analysis of his theoretical and practical aims as these are expressed in the artist’s writings, comments and practices of his contemporaries, aimed at providing a new perspective on the relationship between making and meaning in the examined works, and, also, to increase our understanding of the complex applied skills and artistic practices of the Russian avant-garde artists. The results not only gave insights into the relationship between theory and practice, and into techniques and workshop practices, they also contributed to issues of condition and authenticity .


Caroline Levitt

In 2008-09, Caroline Levitt was a visiting lecturer at the Courtauld Institute of Art.  She was then completing her PhD on the relationship between Guillaume Apollinaire and André Breton as manifested through their involvement and interest in artistic practices such as graffiti, illustration, cinema and the collection and construction of objects. She published an article in the 2007 issue of Immediations, entitled ‘Screening poetry: Guillaume Apollinaire, André Breton and experimental cinema’. Specialising in French art and literature of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, other research interests, which she was planning to develop over the next few years, included the relationships between literature and sculpture, the work of Le Corbusier and the participation of artists in the decorative arts.


Mark McDonald

Mark McDonald is Curator of Old Master prints and Spanish drawings at the British Museum. His research interest include sixteenth and seventeenth century Spanish art, and European printmaking during the Renaissance. His recent publication The Print Collection of Ferdinand Columbus 1488-1539: a Renaissance collector in Seville was awarded the Mitchell Prize for Art History, the Eleanor Tufts Award for Hispanic studies in 2006, and named the Book of the Year by Apollo in 2004. His current and future research interests include Italian Chiaroscuro prints, the print collection of Cassiano dal Pozzo, Goya and Spanish drawings.


Charles Miller

In 2008-09, Charlie Miller was Visiting Lecturer at the Courtauld, from which he received his PhD in 2006 for The Ambivalent Eye: Picasso 1925-1933. From 2005 to 2007 he was research fellow at the AHRC Research Centre for Studies of Surrealism and its Legacies, University of Essex. He published three pieces, ‘Apocalypse’, ‘Archaeology’ and ‘Pablo Picasso’, in Ades and Baker, eds., Undercover Surrealism: Georges Bataille and DOCUMENTS (Hayward Gallery and MIT Press, 2006), winner of the Art Newspaper & AXA Art Exhibition Catalogue Award. He is editor of ‘The Use-Value of Documents’, a special issue of the Papers of Surrealism (Autumn 2007), to which he has contributed a critical ‘Introduction’, an article entitled ‘Bataille with Picasso: Crucifixion and Apocalypse’, and a translation of an essay by Georges Didi-Huberman. His general research areas are the production and reception of Picasso, and the history and theory of the avant-garde. He was working on articles and a book about Picasso and surrealism. A second book project concerns avant-garde (ab)uses of history.


Alexandra Moschovi

Dr Alexandra Moschovi’s research has concentrated on the institutionalisation of photography in the 1980s and 1990s, exploring how its belated accommodation in the modern/contemporary art museum ushered in an ontological reassessment not only of its properties as a fine art practice, but also of the museum’s foundational values. Her research interests also include British and American cultural policies and issues relating to contemporary politics of representation. Recent curatorial projects have focused on the fusion of the private into the public and the changing morpheme of the post-industrial landscape in contemporary photographic practice. She was working on the recontextualisation of nineteenth-century photographs in various institutions, examining their collecting and taxonomic biography and how their use and exhibition value has changed.


Austin Nevin

Austin Nevin is involved in the Andrew W. Mellon funded “Master of the Fogg Pieta – Maestro di Figline Project” – a project which aims to create a research-based website, integrating art historical and technical information about a group of
related but dispersed works by the Master of the Fogg Pietà, a major
but little-studied artist, active in Florence and Assisi, c.1310 –
c.1330 (also known as the  Maestro di  Figline). Two of the panels
from this putative ensemble belong to the Courtauld Institute, London,
the Harvard University Art Museums and in other European and American
museums. The intention of the pilot project is to bring together “virtually” the various
pieces that have been associated with a single ensemble by the Master
of the Fogg Pietà, together with detailed information concerning their
conservation, physical characteristics and history.  This provided
the basis for further research and study of the probable components of
this altarpiece, and has the potential to expand from this nucleus to
a consideration of the wider oeuvre of the Master, an artist of
considerable technical interest, who worked in fresco and as a stained
glass designer as well as on panel.


Divia Patel

Divia Patel is a curator in the Asian Department of the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Her areas of expertise include 19th century photography of India, contemporary Indian art and popular culture. She co-curated an exhibition of paintings by western artists in India from the 17th -20th centuries, which toured in India during 2009. She curated the award wining, internationally touring exhibition, Cinema India: The Art of Bollywood and the photography section of the V&A exhibition, Arts of the Sikh Kingdoms (1999).  Her projects in 2008-09 included a display of photographs of Buddhist sites across Asia for April 2009, and research on contemporary design in India. Her publications include Cinema India: The Visual Culture of the Hindi Film, Reaktion Press, 2002, and articles on photography, contemporary art and the paintings of Ajanta.


Andreas Puth

In 2008-09, Andreas Puth was a Visiting Lecturer at the Courtauld, teaching English and French Gothic architecture. He is interested in medieval architecture across Europe and has investigated fourteenth-century buildings in the Holy Roman Empire as settings for public imagery in urban contexts. Two articles on representations of the emperor and the seven electors on the trade hall in Mainz and the ruler imagery of Emperor Charles IV on the main parish church at Muhlhausen were in the press. He was completing his PhD thesis, ‘Imitatio Caroli, Imitatio Rudolphi?,’  reconsidering Habsburg dynastic representation c. 1360 to c. 1490. This looked at the visual strategies employed in various media by a “new” dynasty in fourteenth- and fifteenth-century Central Europe in order to foster an own identity and to advance its political ambitions. The thesis located Habsburg ruler imagery in a pan-European context, employing methodological revisions such as the questioning of the concept of ‘court art’ not yet sufficiently applied to Central European ruler patronage, and challenging the art-historical model of imitatio which has traditionally focused on the model allegedly provided for the Habsburgs by Charles IV and the court art and architecture he inspired in Prague. Publication of a conference paper on these issues is also forthcoming.


Evgeny Steiner

Evgeny Steiner is a specialist in traditional Japanese art and in the 19th-20th centuries Russian art. His books include Stories for Little Comrades: Revolutionary Artists and the Making of Early Soviet Children’s Books (Univ. of Washington Press, 1999; Russian enlarged edition, 2002); Zen-Life: Ikkyu and Beyond (St.Petersburg, 2006; English edition is under preparation); Catalog of Japanese Prints in the Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts, 2 volumes, (Moscow, 2008 – edited, translated Japanese poetry and wrote about 650 entries); Victory Over the Sun, (London, 2008 – translated trans-rational Russian Futurist texts with commentaries and introduction). Prof. Steiner is Senior Research Associate at the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts (based at School of Oriental & African Studies, London) and Principal Research Fellow of the Russian Institute for Cultural Research (Moscow). In 2008-09, his project dealed with European uncatalogued repositories of art displaced as a result of WWII. To enable him to work on this project, Prof. Steiner was named International & Area Studies Fellow ’08-09 by the American Council of Learned Societies and Wingate Scholar by the Wingate Foundation.


Kate Stonor

Kate Stonor is a conservator with a special interest in the technical study of paintings with a view to illuminating artistic practice. Her research was based on British paintings in the Courtauld Gallery Collection and she undertook studies on both modern painters, such as Walter Richard Sickert, and Stuart painters, including Sir Peter Lely. Along with her colleague, Clare Richardson, Kate was working on an online database of colourmen’s stamps to aid both conservators and art historians to identify the markings left by artists’ suppliers on the reverse of paintings and give a specific date range for the production of the support. This database will build into a large reference collection, allowing people to search by artist or artistic group to look at patterns of use for types of support and artists’ supplier.


Zahira Veliz

Zahira Véliz has published frequently on the subject of Spanish drawings, especially the work of Alonso Cano. She has organised exhibitions at the Museo del Prado, Madrid and at the Museo de Bellas Artes de Asturias, Oviedo, Spain. In 2006 she organised a Wallace Collection exhibition focusing on Lady with a Fan by Velázquez, together with the variant from Chatsworth. Trained originally as an art conservator, she has contributed many articles to the literature of technical art history, and in 1986 she published Artists’ Treatises in Golden Age Spain (Cambridge University Press).  She has written numerous articles and lectured widely on Spanish art in the early modern era, and, as a member of the Centro de Estudios de Europa Hispánica (Madrid) is currently cataloguing the Spanish drawings in the collection of the Courtauld Institute, and working on the reconstruction of William Stirling-Maxwell’s drawings collection.


Laura Veneskey

Laura Veneskey was a PhD candidate at Northwestern University.  Her research investigated the circulation of sacred sites through portable artifacts between Late Antiquity and the Middle Byzantine period.  It was particularly concerned with the varying methods through which sacred place was evoked, recreated, and reused in disparate contexts, engendering sanctity in new locations and forging networks of power throughout the medieval Mediterranean.  She wasworking on a translation and commentary of a portion of the Patriarch Nikephoros’ Refutatio et eversio.


Aurélie Verdier

Aurélie Verdier was a PhD candidate at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (Paris) and a curator. Her thesis was entitled ‘Francis Picabia, Avant-Gardism and Ego Politics’, and focused on how an ’empty’ subjectivity transformed modernism during the teens. In 2008-09, she was working on expressions of identity in the avant-garde, specifically portraiture and the name. She worked on related themes for several years and has published regularly in Les Cahiers du Musée national d’art moderne (‘Ego Dada’, Summer 2004; ‘La Fabrique du silence. Mythologie et mise en scène chez Marcel Duchamp’, Spring 2006) and has published an introduction book to Dada in 2005 (Flammarion). She was the recipient of the Henri Focillon Fellowship at Yale University (Autumn 2006).


Rose Walker

Rose Walker is a specialist in medieval Spanish art. She was working on a project that focuses on the interaction between culture and landscape. The British Academy funded four field trips that constituted the first phase of this project. Each trip took one of the principal Roman roads that crossed the Iberian peninsula seeking alternative narratives to ‘the pilgrimage route’ and ‘the re-conquest’.  These narratives were revealed through diversions, detours and changes of direction that together demonstrated a new sense of belonging amongst the people who settled and built on new and old sites. A photographic record of the routes and of the art and architecture that defined them was an important part of the project.


Giles Waterfield

Giles Waterfield is an independent curator and writer, Associate Scholar at the Courtauld Institute of Art and Director of Royal Collection Studies. He taught the Courtauld’s M.A. in the History and Theory of The Art Museum, and has worked as Head of Education at the Royal Pavilion, Art Gallery and Museums and as Director of Dulwich Picture Gallery from 1979 to 1996.  He was joint curator of the exhibition Art Treasures of England at the Royal Academy of Arts in 1998, In Celebration: The Art of the Country House at the Tate Gallery in 1998 and Below Stairs, National Portrait Galleries, London and Edinburgh, in 2003-4.  He is an authority on the history of museums and his publications include: Palaces of Art, Art for the People and Soane and Death, as well as three novels. He is a member of the Advisory Committee of the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, a Vice-President of NADFAS and Trustee of Charleston, Sussex.


Rachel Wells

Rachel Wells was a Henry Moore Foundation Post-Doctoral Research Fellow. She was extending her PhD thesis on scale in contemporary sculpture in order to publish this research. Evaluating the relationship between Postmodernism and the trend of enlargements, miniaturisations and life-size sculptures made since the 1990s, the research also encompassed the photographic reproduction of this work.


Catherine Yvard

Catherine Yvard started at the Courtauld in 2008 working as Project Officer on the Survey of Gothic Ivories. Until then, she was cataloguing medieval and Renaissance manuscripts for the online Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts at the British Library, and had worked previously on the medieval manuscripts collections at the Bodleian Library in Oxford and the Chester Beatty Library in Dublin. She has taught several courses on illuminated manuscripts in the late Middle Ages at Trinity College, Dublin and University College, Dublin. Her publications include ‘The Glenstal Prayer Book’, in Art and Devotion in Medieval Ireland, (Dublin, 2006), pp. 98-120, and ‘Un livre d’heures inédit à la Chester Beatty Library de Dublin’, in Art de l’enluminure, 19 (Dec. 2006-Feb. 2007), pp. 2-65. She specialises in the study of late-medieval Books of Hours and is particularly interested in the transition from manuscript to printed, and in the transmission of patterns through time and space. She was then turning her attention to ivories, as she was to be working closely with them over the next few years.

2007-08

Elizabeth Bartman
Elizabeth Bartman is a specialist in Greek and Roman art. She is presently working on two major projects: a study of ethnic identity in Roman portraiture and of the “ideal” sculpture – images of gods, mythic figures, personifications, etc. as opposed to historical personages – collected by Henry Blundell in the late eighteenth century for his estate at Ince outside Liverpool. The largest private collection ever assembled in Britain, Blundell’s statues present a cross-section of Roman decorative sculpture; heavily restored, they are as much a reflection of eighteenth-century art as of ancient. Working with this material has led her into new areas of research such as the Grand Tour, collecting, and the reception of the antique. She was elected First Vice-President of the Archaeological Institute of America in January 2007.


Lee Beard
Lee Beard is a Visiting Lecturer at the Courtauld Institute of Art. He completed his PhD, entitled “Modernist Cell” or “Gentle Nest”; Ben Nicholson, Art, Design and the Modern Interior 1924-1939, at the Courtauld in 2003. His current research is a development of themes originating from this project, in particular those concerned with the relationship between modern art and the domestic interior in Britain during the early to mid- twentieth century. Focusing on the period 1919-1959, and working under the title ‘Living with Modernism’, his aim is to evaluate the many ideologies and strategies that have informed and shaped the interaction between art and notions domesticity in modernist production and display. In May 2007 Lee organised a two-day conference on Ben Nicholson at the Courtauld, and his essay ‘Pottery as precedent: Herbert Read and the sculptural form’ is published in Re-Reading Read: New Views of Herbert Read (Freedom Press, 2007).


James Boaden
James Boaden’s PhD research engages with questions of nostalgia and the pastoral genre in collage, assembled sculpture and experimental film in 1950s America. James has published articles on the subject in the Courtauld Institute’s scholarly journal immediations as well as the on-line journal of the AHRC Centre for Surrealism and its Legacies: Papers of Surrealism. James has also conducted freelance curatorial work for the exhibition ‘Starting at Zero: Black Mountain College 1933-1957’ (Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge, 2005) and for the screenings entitled ‘Lights Up: American Structural Film’ at the National Film Theatre, London in 2006.


John Cherry

John Cherry, who retired as Keeper of Medieval and Modern Europe in the British Museum in 2002, has research interests that include medieval metalwork, seals, jewellery and ivories. He is currently working with Professor John Lowden on a publication of the medieval objects in the Thomson collection, which is to be displayed in the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, from 2008. He has also published many articles on seal and seal matrices, and is currently working on a catalogue of the Rawlinson collection of medieval and post-medieval seal matrices in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. Secular iconography on seals and their matrices is a particular interest.


Peter Dent

Peter Dent is a British Academy Post-Doctoral Research Fellow.  He is currently working on a project entitled ‘Sculpture and the Senses in Late Medieval Italy’. This will concentrate on the strategies that Italian sculptors employed in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries in order to communicate a sense of ‘presence’. Beyond the immediate historical contexts for this enquiry, he is also exploring how developments during this period may relate to the long running theoretical debate about the nature of sculpture, in particular its ability to stimulate the sense of touch, in contrast to painting, which is primarily concerned with sight. This interest grew out of research conducted for his PhD, The Body of Christ in Fourteenth-Century Tuscan Sculpture, undertaken at the Courtauld Institute of Art and completed in 2005. More generally, he is interested in the relationships between sculpture and painting.


Caroline Elam

Caroline Elam’s research interests include many areas of Italian renaissance art, architecture and urbanism, as well as the history of  art history and criticism since the mid nineteenth century. She is currently completing a book on Roger Fry and Italian Art for Yale University Press, and writing a chapter on ‘Art in Lorenzo de’ Magnifico’s Florence’ for a volume on Renaissance Florence to be published by Cambridge University Press. She has recently co-curated and edited the catalogue of an exhibition on Michelangelo’s architectural drawings for the Centro Palladiano in Vicenza (closing 10 December 2006) which will move to the Casa Buonarroti, Florence, from 15 December to 19 March 2007. Her next project is a book to be called The Urban Face of Renaissance Florence.


Stefania Gerevini

Stefania Gerevini’s PhD research concerns issues of artistic portability, importation and reuse in the middle ages. More specifically, it concentrates on the acquisition of Byzantine artefacts in Venice and Siena in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, and on the material, functional and symbolic modifications that such objects underwent in the process of their translation from east to west to their new cultures. More broadly interested in artistic exchanges between Byzantium and its neighbouring cultures, she carried out a field project on the reuse of Byzantine spolia in Seljuk religious architecture in Central Turkey as a grantee of the Fondation M. de Montalembert in 2006, and taught at Università L. Bocconi, Milan, a course of Intercultural Studies in 2007. She is currently a Visiting Lecturer at the Courtauld Institute of Art.


Helen Glanville

Helen Glanville is an independent scholar, researcher and a practicing conservator of paintings, and was a visiting lecturer at the Courtauld until July 2007 on the MA “History and Theory of the Art Museum 1750-present day”. April 2007 saw the publication of her translation of Alessandro Conti’s History of the Conservation and Restoration of Works of Art(Elsevier/Heinemann), which provides the first history of the practice for the English speaking world, as well as a glossary of terms for the non-specialist and an introductory essay on “Relativity and Restoration”. The grey areas between perception and the material aspects of painting, and the sciences linked to perception are a particular field of interest. Glanville’s research on these topics covers a wide historical range, including articles on “Veracity, Verisimilitude and Optics in Italy at the turn of the seventeenth century” (Italian Studies, 2001) and nineteenth century colour theories in Pre-Raphaelite Painting Techniques (Tate Gallery Publications, 2004, ed. Joyce Townsend) looking in particular at Eastlake’s translation of Goethe’s Theory of Colour. Glanville’s research in these areas focuses particularly on texts dealing with visual perception of the arts and aesthetics in relation to the practices and materials in painting from the turn of the seventeenth century to the nineteenth century, and in later translations of these texts (for instance of Leonardo’s Treatise on Painting), as well as the applications of the theories of relativity to the arts (and indeed the philosophy and practice of restoration). Glanville’s most recent publication (in press) is an essay entitled “Cesare Brandi, Newton and the National Gallery”. Another on-going area of research involves trawling through the National Gallery Archives with a view to writing a book on the history of the cleaning controversies at the National Gallery from the 1850s to the present day, from a European perspective.


Teresa Gleadowe

Teresa Gleadowe was the founding director of the MA programme Curating Contemporary Art at the Royal College of Art and directed the course from 1992 to 2006. During this period the department pioneered research into relationships between contemporary art and curatorial practice and developed a series of ambitious international art exhibitions selected and curated by students on the course. Teresa Gleadowe is now continuing her research into aspects of recent curatorial history and is Commissioning Editor for a new series of books, which will provide a historical study and critical appraisal of significant exhibitions of contemporary art in the period from the mid-twentieth century to the present.


Linda Goddard

Linda Goddard is a British Academy Postdoctoral Research Fellow. Her research focuses on the relationship between painting and literature, as well as art criticism and artists’ writings in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century France. She completed her PhD, Aesthetic Hierarchies: interchange and rivalry between the visual arts and literature in France, c.1890-c.1920 at the Courtauld in 2004, and has since taught at the Courtauld and the University of Cambridge. She is currently researching the writings of Paul Gauguin in the context of interdisciplinary tension and interaction in fin-de-siècle France. She has published two articles, ‘Birds of a Feather? Gauguin’s ambivalent relationship with literary symbolism’,immediations: the research journal of the Courtauld Institute of Art, 2005 and ‘Mallarmé, Picasso and the aesthetic of the newspaper’, Word & Image, October-December 2006, and co-edited the exhibition catalogue Literary Circles: artist, author, word and image in Britain, 1800-1920, Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, 2006.


Melena Hope
Melena Hope is currently working towards a doctoral degree at the Courtauld Institute of Art. Her research concerns the iconographical content and function of painted chapels and oratories in the households of fifteenth-century France.  While her specific interests centre around religious wall paintings in domestic settings, she is more broadly interested in the function and audience of ‘private’ devotional artworks, the relationship between artworks of different media (especially the interplay between works of art and their architectural settings), the working methods of artists in this period, and artistic culture in Northern Europe in the fifteenth century. In addition to her research, she is a Visiting Lecturer at the Courtauld and a Sessional Lecturer at Birkbeck College.


Matthew Hunter

Matthew Hunter is a Visiting Lecturer at the Courtauld Institute of Art. He received his PhD from the University of Chicago in August 2007, writing a dissertation entitled “Robert Hooke Fecit: Making and Knowing in Restoration London.” His research interests include early modern art and architecture, representation in art and science, and theories of artistic community. He is currently preparing publications on the work and thought of Robert Hooke, while editing a collection of essays on representation in interdisciplinary perspective. His recent publications include “Iconoclasm and Consumption; or, Household Management According to Thomas Cromwell,” in Iconoclasm: Contested Images, Contested Terms(Ashgate, 2007).


Pascal Labreuche

Pascal Labreuche is an independent painting conservator and researcher in history of technology; specialising in the study of artists’ suppliers in the nineteenth century, French canvas makers, and the history of invention in the field of artists paintings supports. He completed his PhD in history of science and technology, entitled Commercially primed artists canvases in Paris, 1793-1867. The industrialization of a procedure involving tradition and innovation, at the Université de Nantes (France) in 2005. As fellow of the Caroline Villers Research Fellowship at the Courtauld Institute of Art, he is currently focusing his research on the comparison of the invention movement between the UK, France and USA during the nineteenth century, especially through the study of patents, trademarks, and archives and documents related to paintings supports.


Mark McDonald

Mark McDonald is Curator of Old Master prints and Spanish drawings at the British Museum. His research interest include sixteenth and seventeenth century Spanish art, and European printmaking during the Renaissance. His recent publication The Print Collection of Ferdinand Columbus 1488-1539: a Renaissance collector in Seville was awarded the Mitchell Prize for Art History, the Eleanor Tufts Award for Hispanic studies in 2006, and named the Book of the Year by Apollo in 2004. His current and future research interests include Italian Chiaroscuro prints, the print collection of Cassiano dal Pozzo, Goya and Spanish drawings.


Antigoni Memou

Antigoni Memou is a Visiting Lecturer at the Courtauld Institute of Art. She is currently completing her PhD thesis, entitled From the Globalisation of the Movement (1968) to the Movement Against Globalisation (2001): Social Movements, Photography, Representation in the Late Twentieth Century. Her research focuses on the circulation of photographs of these movements in established institutions, mainstream mass media and the movements themselves and examines the function of photography in a complex system of transmission of political ideas. Her broader research interests include contemporary art, history and theory of photography, the relationship of aesthetics to politics, and more specifically issues of globalisation, alternative media and Internet activism.


Charles Miller

Charlie Miller is Visiting Lecturer at the Courtauld, from which he received his PhD in 2006 forThe Ambivalent Eye: Picasso 1925-1933. From 2005 to 2007 he was research fellow at the AHRC Research Centre for Studies of Surrealism and its Legacies, University of Essex. He published three pieces, ‘Apocalypse’, ‘Archaeology’ and ‘Pablo Picasso’, in Ades and Baker, eds., Undercover Surrealism: Georges Bataille and DOCUMENTS (Hayward Gallery and MIT Press, 2006), winner of the Art Newspaper & AXA Art Exhibition Catalogue Award. He is editor of ‘The Use-Value of Documents‘, a special issue of the Papers of Surrealism (Autumn 2007), to which he has contributed a critical ‘Introduction’, an article entitled ‘Bataille with Picasso: Crucifixion and Apocalypse’, and a translation of an essay by Georges Didi-Huberman. His general research areas are the production and reception of Picasso, and the history and theory of the avant-garde. He is working on articles and a book about Picasso and surrealism. A second book project concerns avant-garde (ab)uses of history.


John Milner

John Milner is Professor Emeritus at Newcastle University. His current research activities include:
1. The interaction of Russian Futurists and Italian Futurists. Russian Futurist writers and painters responded immediately to Italian futurist manifestos, and to works seen, and heard, in Paris and in Italy. Yet at the same time they were eager to assert their own distinctive interests, priorities, and independent identity. The result is a rich relationship and critique that in Russia contributed to the development of Revolutionary futurism and to quite different collaborations among émigré futurists outside Russia. This research will be manifest as an exhibition at the Estorick Collection, London, scheduled for March 2007.
2. Research into the origins of Museums of Modern Art, especially in Europe. This has been supported by Leverhulme research leave and associated travel has been supported by the British Academy.
3. Critical Essay on artists’ texts aimed at effecting social change in the period 1870 – 1917.


Alexandra Moschovi

Dr Alexandra Moschovi’s research has concentrated on the institutionalisation of photography in the 1980s and 1990s, exploring how its belated accommodation in the modern/contemporary art museum ushered in an ontological reassessment not only of its properties as a fine art practice, but also of the museum’s foundational values. Her research interests also include British and American cultural policies and issues relating to contemporary politics of representation. Recent curatorial projects have focused on the fusion of the private into the public and the changing morpheme of the post-industrial landscape in contemporary photographic practice. She is currently working on the recontextualisation of nineteenth-century photographs in various institutions, examining their collecting and taxonomic biography and how their use and exhibition value has changed.


Satish Padiyar

Satish Padiyar’s interest is in the interrelations between art and the body, self, sexuality and philosophy. His research has focussed these concerns on the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth century art of Jacques-Louis David and Antonio Canova. Specifically, he attempts to read David’s painting in relation to contemporary post-structuralist theories of the subject and sexuality (for example, the philosophical work of Jacques Lacan and Judith Butler); as well as in relation to recent queer and gay methodologies (therefore reading the historical archive for its silences and constitutive exclusions). The result of this is a book, published in 2007, Chains. David, Canova and the Fall of the Public Hero in Postrevolutionary France. Currently, he is engaged on two projects: a monograph on the complex early-nineteenth century sculptural practice of Antonio Canova; and a study of history painting, self and philosophical notions of freedom from Courbet to Picasso.


Gavin Parkinson

Gavin Parkinson completed his PhD at the Courtauld in 2000 and taught subsequently at the Courtauld, Birkbeck College, and the University of Oxford. He specialises in Surrealist art and thought, the interfaces between art and science, and questions of interpretation in art history with particular reference to Marcel Duchamp and Postmodernism. He has published essays, articles, and book reviews on Surrealism and modern physics, Marcel Duchamp, and Adolf Wölfli. In 2008, he will publish three books: Surrealism, Art, and Modern Science with Yale University Press; The Duchamp Book with Tate Publishing; and a collection of his writings on aspects of Surrealism for Oneworld Publications. He is currently at work on a project that goes under the onerous title, Metafictional Historiography of Art.


Edward Payne

Edward Payne is a third-year PhD student and Visiting Lecturer at the Courtauld. His research focuses on seventeenth-century Spanish and Neapolitan painting, prints and drawings, with particular reference to the works of Jusepe de Ribera (1591-1652). He is currently writing his doctoral thesis on violence and corporality in the art of Ribera, and organising with Scott Nethersole a symposium entitled Histories of Violence: Italy and the Mediterranean c.1300-1700. Additionally, Edward is working with Dr Zahira Véliz on a catalogue raisonné of Spanish drawings from the Courtauld collection, and he has submitted an article to immediations which examines an intriguing caricature by Pier Francesco Mola (1612-66), also located in the Courtauld Gallery.


Andreas Puth

Andreas Puth is currently a Visiting Lecturer at the Courtauld, teaching English and French Gothic architecture. He is interested in medieval architecture across Europe and has investigated fourteenth-century buildings in the Holy Roman Empire as settings for public imagery in urban contexts. Two articles on representations of the emperor and the seven electors on the trade hall in Mainz and the ruler imagery of Emperor Charles IV on the main parish church at Muhlhausen are in the press. Currently, he is completing his PhD thesis,Imitatio Caroli, Imitatio Rudolphi? Reconsidering Habsburg dynastic representation c. 1360 to c. 1490. This looks at the visual strategies employed in various media by a “new” dynasty in fourteenth- and fifteenth-century Central Europe in order to foster an own identity and to advance its political ambitions. The thesis attempts to locate Habsburg ruler imagery in a pan-European context, employing methodological revisions such as the questioning of the concept of ‘court art’ not yet sufficiently applied to Central European ruler patronage, and challenging the art-historical model of imitatio which has traditionally focused on the model allegedly provided for the Habsburgs by Charles IV and the court art and architecture he inspired in Prague. Publication of a conference paper on these issues is also forthcoming.


Elisabeth Reissner

As the first Caroline Villers Research Fellow Elisabeth Reissner will be studying Cézanne from the perspective of technical art history. She will be investigating the materials and techniques and historical context of the nine Cézanne works in the Courtauld Collections. This will include the ways in which he constructed his images. She will be collaborating with the National Gallery, so that inclusion in the project of their Cézannes will ensure a comprehensive range of his works in the study. The study will both situate Cézanne within, and contribute to, the growing body of research into the studio practice, materials and techniques in the second half of the 19th century in France.


Clare Richardson

Clare Richardson is a Paul Mellon fellow in the Department of Conservation and Technology. Over the past three years Clare has focused on the work of Victorian painters, exploring their methods and materials, with a particular focus on the work of Rebecca Orpen, a prolific amateur painter. Through an ongoing collaboration with the National Trust, Clare has examined the large collection of Rebecca’s paintings in the collection of Baddesley Clinton house. Clare is now exploring the work of William Etty RA, examining paintings from Anglesey Abbey (National Trust), and collaborating with colleagues at Tate and Manchester Art Gallery.


Kate Stonor

Kate Stonor is a conservator with a special interest in the technical study of paintings with a view to illuminating artistic practice. Her current research is based on British paintings in the Courtauld Gallery Collection and she is undertaking studies on both modern painters, such as Walter Richard Sickert, and Stuart painters, including Sir Peter Lely. Along with her colleague, Clare Richardson, Kate is hoping to create an online database of colourmen’s stamps. This would aid both conservators and art historians to identify the markings left by artists’ suppliers on the reverse of paintings and give a specific date range for the production of the support. It is hoped that this database would build into a large reference collection, allowing people to search by artist or artistic group to look at patterns of use for types of support and artists’ supplier.


Achim Timmermann

Achim Timmermann (PhD, Courtauld Institute of Art, 1996) is Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor as well as the current Kress Fellow at the Warburg Institute in London, and specializes in late medieval art and architecture of northern and central Europe. His scholarly interests include Gothic architecture, the visual culture of the eucharist, and the representation of Christian-Jewish relationships in medieval art. His most recent publications have focused on didactic and moralizing imagery, and the role of monuments and images in the performance of late medieval and early modern rituals of criminal punishment.


Zahira Véliz

Zahira Véliz has published frequently on the subject of Spanish drawings, especially the work of Alonso Cano. She has organised exhibitions at the Museo del Prado, Madrid and at the Museo de Bellas Artes de Asturias, Oviedo, Spain. In 2006 she organised a Wallace Collection exhibition focusing on Lady with a Fan by Velázquez, together with the variant from Chatsworth. Trained originally as an art conservator, she has contributed many articles to the literature of technical art history, and in 1986 she published Artists’ Treatises in Golden Age Spain (Cambridge University Press).  She has written numerous articles and lectured widely on Spanish art in the early modern era, and, as a member of the Centro de Estudios de Europa Hispánica (Madrid) is currently cataloguing the Spanish drawings in the collection of the Courtauld Institute, and working on the reconstruction of William Stirling-Maxwell’s drawings collection.


Rose Walker

Rose Walker is a specialist in medieval Spanish art. She is currently working on a project that focuses on the interaction between culture and landscape. The British Academy is funding four field trips that constitute the first phase of this project. Each trip takes one of the principal Roman roads that crossed the Iberian peninsula and seeks alternative narratives to ‘the pilgrimage route’ and ‘the re-conquest’.  These narratives are revealed through diversions, detours and changes of direction that together demonstrate a new sense of belonging amongst the people who settled and built on new and old sites. A photographic record of the routes and of the art and architecture that defined them is an important part of the project.


Giles Waterfield

Giles Waterfield is an independent curator and writer, Associate Scholar at the Courtauld Institute of Art and Director of Royal Collection Studies. He taught the Courtauld’s M.A. in the History and Theory of The Art Museum, and has worked as Head of Education at the Royal Pavilion, Art Gallery and Museums and as Director of Dulwich Picture Gallery from 1979 to 1996.  He was joint curator of the exhibition Art Treasures of England at the Royal Academy of Arts in 1998, In Celebration: The Art of the Country House at the Tate Gallery in 1998 and Below Stairs, National Portrait Galleries, London and Edinburgh, in 2003-4.  He is an authority on the history of museums and his publications include: Palaces of Art, Art for the People and Soane and Death, as well as three novels. He is a member of the Advisory Committee of the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, a Vice-President of NADFAS and Trustee of Charleston, Sussex.


Rachel Wells

Rachel Wells is a Henry Moore Foundation Post-Doctoral Research Fellow. She is currently extending her PhD thesis on scale in contemporary sculpture in order to publish this research. Evaluating the relationship between Postmodernism and the trend of enlargements, miniaturisations and life-size sculptures made since the 1990s, the research also encompasses the photographic reproduction of this work.

2006-07

Elizabeth Bartman
Elizabeth Bartman is a specialist in Greek and Roman art. She is presently working on two major projects: a study of ethnic identity in Roman portraiture (supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities) and of the “ideal” sculpture – images of gods, mythic figures, personifications, etc. as opposed to historical personages – collected by Henry Blundell in the late eighteenth century for his estate at Ince outside Liverpool. The largest private collection ever assembled in Britain, Blundell’s statues present a cross-section of Roman decorative sculpture; heavily restored, they are as much a reflection of eighteenth-century art as of ancient. Working with this material has led Elizabeth Bartman into new areas of research such as the Grand Tour, collecting, and the reception of the antique.


Lee Beard

Lee Beard is a British Academy Post-Doctoral Research Fellow. He completed his PhD, entitled “Modernist Cell” or “Gentle Nest”; Ben Nicholson, Art, Design and the Modern Interior 1924-1939, at the Courtauld in 2003. His current research is a development of themes originating from this project, in particular those concerned with the relationship between modern art and the domestic interior in Britain during the early to mid- twentieth century. Focusing on the period 1919-1959, and working under the title ‘Living with Modernism’, his aim is to evaluate the many ideologies and strategies that have informed and shaped the interaction between art and notions domesticity in modernist production and display.


James Boaden

James Boaden’s PhD research engages with questions of nostalgia and the pastoral genre in collage, assembled sculpture and experimental film in 1950s America. James has published articles on the subject in the Courtauld Institute’s scholarly journal immediations as well as the on-line journal of the AHRC Centre for Surrealism and its Legacies: Papers of Surrealism. James has also conducted freelance curatorial work for the exhibition ‘Starting at Zero: Black Mountain College 1933-1957’ (Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge, 2005) and for the screenings entitled ‘Lights Up: American Structural Film’ at the National Film Theatre, London in 2006.


Peter Dent

Peter Dent is a British Academy Post-Doctoral Research Fellow.  He is currently working on a project entitled ‘Sculpture and the Senses in Late Medieval Italy’. This will concentrate on the strategies that Italian sculptors employed in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries in order to communicate a sense of ‘presence’. Beyond the immediate historical contexts for this enquiry, he is also exploring how developments during this period may relate to the long running theoretical debate about the nature of sculpture, in particular its ability to stimulate the sense of touch, in contrast to painting, which is primarily concerned with sight.
This interest grew out of research conducted for his PhD, The Body of Christ in Fourteenth-Century Tuscan Sculpture, undertaken at the Courtauld Institute of Art and completed in 2005. More generally, he is interested in the relationships between sculpture and painting.


Caroline Elam

Caroline Elam’s research interests include many areas of Italian renaissance art, architecture and urbanism, as well as the history of  art history and criticism since the mid nineteenth century. She is currently completing a book on Roger Fry and Italian Art for Yale University Press, and writing a chapter on ‘Art in Lorenzo de’ Magnifico’s Florence’ for a volume on Renaissance Florence to be published by Cambridge University Press. She has recently co-curated and edited the catalogue of an exhibition on Michelangelo’s architectural drawings for the Centro Palladiano in Vicenza (closing 10 December 2006) which will move to the Casa Buonarroti, Florence, from 15 December to 19 March 2007. Her next project is a book to be called The Urban Face of Renaissance Florence.


Kathryn Gerry

Kathryn Gerry is working towards a doctoral degree in the history of art department at Johns Hopkins University, supervised by Dr Herbert Kessler.  She currently holds a pre-doctoral fellowship from the Kress Foundation, and is conducting research at the Courtauld Institute.  Her doctoral research concerns the Alexis Quire, a portion of the St Albans Psalter; in her thesis she will address questions as to the original production and function of this quire, before it was joined to the rest of the St Albans Psalter. In addition to her work with manuscripts, Kate’s earlier projects have focused on portable arts in the Byzantine Empire, stained glass in France and England, and medieval European pilgrimage.


Matthew Hunter

Matthew Hunter is presently a Whiting Foundation Fellow at the Courtauld Institute, through which he is researching and writing a dissertation on the cultures of visualisation in the early Royal Society of London. Tentatively entitled Robert Hooke Fecit: Making and Knowing in Restoration London, his project focuses upon the activities of the late seventeenth-century polymathic experimentalist Robert Hooke, with particular interest in his inter-related practices of drawing, collecting and building. Having trained in the visual arts himself, Matthew Hunter’s research interests more generally include interfaces of art and science and inter-disciplinary approaches to problems of representation.


Jill Lloyd

Jill Lloyd is a specialist in early 20th-century German and Austrian art. Her book German Expressionism, Primitivism and Modernity was published by Yale University Press in 1991 and awarded the National Art Book Prize. She is currently working on two research projects. First, an in depth study of Vincent Van Gogh’s influence on German and Austrian Expressionism which will result in an exhibition (at the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam and Neue Galerie, New York) and two scholarly publications. Her biography of the Austrian émigré artist, Marie-Louise von Motesiczky, which is based on extensive archive research, will be published by Yale University Press in 2007. When these two projects come to fruition, Jill Lloyd will begin research on the Swiss artist Ferdinand Hodler in preparation for an exhibition in 2008.


Anna Lovatt

Anna Lovatt recently completed her PhD, entitled Seriality and Systematic Drawing circa 1966-1976, at the Courtauld Institute. Her current research, funded by the Henry Moore Foundation, considers the importance of drawing in New York based sculptural practices of the late 1960s and early 70s. Broader research interests include post-war American art and the relevance of systems and communication theory to post-Minimal and Conceptual practices.


Mark McDonald

Mark McDonald is Curator of Old Master prints and Spanish drawings at the British Museum. His research interest include sixteenth and seventeenth century Spanish art, and European printmaking during the Renaissance. His recent publication The Print Collection of Ferdinand Columbus 1488-1539: a Renaissance collector in Seville was awarded Book of the Year by Apollo in 2004 and the Eleanor Tufts Award for Hispanic studies in 2006. His current and future research interests include Italian Chiaroscuro prints, the print collection of Cassiano dal Pozzo, Goya and Spanish drawings.


John Milner

John Milner is Professor Emeritus at Newcastle University. His current research activities include:
1. The interaction of Russian Futurists and Italian Futurists. Russian Futurist writers and painters responded immediately to Italian futurist manifestos, and to works seen, and heard, in Paris and in Italy. Yet at the same time they were eager to assert their own distinctive interests, priorities, and independent identity. The result is a rich relationship and critique that in Russia contributed to the development of Revolutionary futurism and to quite different collaborations among émigré futurists outside Russia. This research will be manifest as an exhibition at the Estorick Collection, London, scheduled for March 2007.
2. Research into the origins of Museums of Modern Art, especially in Europe. This has been supported by Leverhulme research leave and associated travel has been supported by the British Academy.
3. Critical Essay on artists’ texts aimed at effecting social change in the period 1870 – 1917.


Alexandra Moschovi

Dr Alexandra Moschovi’s research has concentrated on the institutionalisation of photography in the 1980s and 1990s, exploring how its belated accommodation in the modern/contemporary art museum ushered in an ontological reassessment not only of its properties as a fine art practice, but also of the museum’s foundational values. Her research interests also include British and American cultural policies and issues relating to contemporary politics of representation. Recent curatorial projects have focused on the fusion of the private into the public and the changing morpheme of the post-industrial landscape in contemporary photographic practice. She is currently working on the recontextualisation of nineteenth-century photographs in various institutions, examining their collecting and taxonomic biography and how their use and exhibition value has changed.


Satish Padiyar

Satish Padiyar’s interest is in the interrelations between the body, self, sexuality and philosophy in late eighteenth-century and early-nineteenth century French neoclassical art. His research has focused these concerns on the art of Jacques-Louis David. Specifically, he attempts to read David’s painting in relation to contemporary post-structuralist theories of the subject and sexuality (for example, the philosophical work of Jacques Lacan and Judith Butler); as well as in relation to recent queer and gay methodologies (reading the historical archive, therefore, for its silences and constitutive exclusions). The result of this is a book, Chains. Jacques-Louis David and the Post-Revolutionary Subject, which is to be published by Pennsylvania State University Press in early 2006. Currently, Satish is engaged on three projects: he is researching a paper on David’s early 1787 Death of Socrates, which enquires into the difficult relationship between Socratic ‘care of the self’ and (homo)sexual subjectivity, as they it is articulated for a French ‘enlightened’ audience; he is working on notions of selfhood, desire, amnesia and exile, as they are raised by David’s post-Brussels (post-1815) profoundly ‘de-centred’ art practice; and he is engaged in research into the complex early nineteenth-century sculptural practice of David’s contemporary, Antonio Canova, with a view to producing a monograph on that artist.


Elisabeth Reissner
As the first Caroline Villers Research Fellow Elisabeth Reissner will be studying Cézanne from the perspective of technical art history. She will be investigating the materials and techniques and historical context of the nine Cézanne works in the Courtauld Collections. This will include the ways in which he constructed his images. She will be collaborating with the National Gallery, so that inclusion in the project of their Cézannes will ensure a comprehensive range of his works in the study. The study will both situate Cézanne within, and contribute to, the growing body of research into the studio practice, materials and techniques in the second half of the 19th century in France.


 

Jessica Richardson

Jessica Richardson’s current work (thesis, Courtauld Institute of Art) focuses on the cult and iconography of St Leonard of Noblat (the French, sixth-century patron saint of prisoners) in medieval and early renaissance Italy. St Leonard gained wide popularity in the whole of Italy (and throughout Europe) in the twelfth century and continued to be the focus of an intense devotion. Her research has shown that he was deemed an appropriate saint for the various religious orders (monastic, military and mendicant). She is primarily interested in the creation and recreation of the image of the saint and its reception at specific centres in Italy, which include Venice, Florence, Prato, Lucca, Siena, Assisi, Rome, Foggia (Apulia) and Sessa Aurunca (Campania). A key issue addressed in her work is how the various images of the saint reveal different aspects of his cult: How did the cult of an ‘early’ and ‘foreign’ saint survive and adapt to the changes that were occurring in late medieval sanctity? It what ways do the representations of the saint provide us with information on new demands placed by both institutions and individuals? More generally, her research interests include the ways in which images of saints are used to promote cults and maintain traditions; the significance of dress in images of holy figures; the relationship between representations of saints and other available primary evidence for their cults (e.g., written lives, relics and site dedications); the creation and maintenance of sacred space and the various motivations behind the depictions of saints in medieval and renaissance Europe.


Kate Stonor

Kate Stonor is a conservator with a special interest in the technical study of paintings with a view to illuminating artistic practice. Her current research is based on British paintings in the Courtauld Gallery Collection and she is undertaking studies on both modern painters, such as Walter Richard Sickert, and Stuart painters, including Sir Peter Lely. Along with her colleague, Clare Richardson, Kate is hoping to create an online database of colourmen’s stamps. This would aid both conservators and art historians to identify the markings left by artists’ suppliers on the reverse of paintings and give a specific date range for the production of the support. It is hoped that this database would build into a large reference collection, allowing people to search by artist or artistic group to look at patterns of use for types of support and artists’ supplier.


Tomoko Uno

Dr Tomoko Uno of the Japan Center for International Cooperation in Conservation, National Research Institute for Cultural Properties, Tokyo, will be a Temporary Associate Scholar of the Research Forum from 6 November to 1 December 2006. Dr Uno is a specialist in diagnostic enviornmental monitoring, with current projects on the conservation of the wall paintings in Bamiyan (Afghanistan) and Dunhuang (China). She will be undertaking research on the methodology employed by the Conservation of Wall Painting Department, and visiting institutes and sites in England where environmental assessment is ongoing.

2005-06

Elizabeth Bartman

Lee Beard

Douglas Brine

Peter Dent

Carline Elam

Kate Gerry

Sacha Gerstein

Matthew Hunter

Jerzy Kierkuc-Bielinski

Anna Lovatt

Opher Mansour

Mark McDonald

John Milner

Alexandra Moschovi

Satish Padiyar

Jessica Richardson

John-Paul Stonard

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